Here Are All the Major Brands Not Advertising on Facebook

Many companies have joined the Stop Hate for Profit boycott campaign

fuzzy distorted blue surrounding a black circle that says bye
A handful of advertisers have committed to not spending on Facebook next month.
iStock

Advertisers are putting money where their missions are.

In the past few days, a handful of brands—beginning with The North Face on June 19—are withdrawing their media dollars from Facebook, in a boycott over the platform’s policies on removing hurtful posts and misinformation. The Stop Hate for Profit boycott campaign was created by the Anti-Defamation LeagueColor of ChangeCommon Sense Media, Free Press, the NAACP and Sleeping Giants and has been picking up steam under the hashtag #StopHateForProfit.

If you haven’t been following along, here’s how we got here:

In a statement, a Facebook spokesperson acknowledged June 26 that the company has “more work to do.”

“We’ll continue to work with civil rights groups, GARM [Global Alliance for Responsible Media] and other experts to develop even more tools, technology and policies to continue this fight,” the company continued in its statement. By the end of the day on Friday, Facebook announced that it would label politicians’ posts that violated its rules.

In announcing their commitments to the campaign, these advertisers did not disclose how much money those spends represented in their broader marketing budget or whether they would continue to still use the company’s ability to target its users on third-party properties with the Facebook Audience Network (FAN), unless otherwise noted below.

In addition, some companies, like Unilever, only adjusted ad spends in the U.S. and some only removed ads from Facebook and not sister company Instagram.

In alphabetical order, here are the brands that have committed to ceasing their Facebook spending and the timelines they’ll do so. This post will be continuously updated.

Adidas, through July

Adidas and subsidiary Reebok will stop ads on Facebook and Instagram internationally through July. “Racist, discriminatory and hateful online content have no place in our brand or in society,” the company said in a statement to Adweek. The company did not immediately say whether it would continue to post organically or use FAN.

American Honda, through July

The U.S. auto brand said June 26 that it would stop running paid advertising on Facebook and Instagram during the month of July. “This is in alignment with our company’s values, which are grounded in human respect,” the company said in a statement. A spokesperson for the company said it would continue to post organically on both platforms during that time. It will also continue to use the platform’s insights from campaigns that ran before July.

Arc’teryx, through July

The Canadian outdoor clothing brand said on Twitter on June 23 that it was “proud” to support the Stop Hate for Profit campaign. “Facebook profits ‘will never be worth promoting hate, bigotry, racism, antisemitism and violence,'” the company tweeted.

The company will cease advertising internationally on Facebook and Instagram and will not use FAN. The media dollars will be donated to access to nature efforts through nonprofit Big City Mountaineers, which provides under-resourced youth with outdoor opportunities to have transformative experiences in the outdoors.

Beam Suntory, through July

The spirits giant told Adweek in an email on June 29 that it was joining the campaign and pausing paid ads on Facebook and Instagram. “We stand with all who are committed to the fight against hate speech, racism and prejudice,” the company said in a statement. “… We hope this collective action helps catalyze positive change and accountability, and we will evaluate our advertising approach beyond July as we await Facebook’s response.” The company did not immediately say whether it would continue to post organically or use FAN.

Ben & Jerry’s, through at least July

Ben & Jerry’s said in a June 23 statement on its website that it would not run ads on Facebook and Instagram during July. “We call on Facebook, Inc. to take the clear and unequivocal actions called for by the campaign to stop its platform from being used to spread and amplify racism and hate,” the company said. A spokesperson for the company told Adweek that Ben & Jerry’s will not pause organic posts, but will suspend all paid ads through FAN.

“This issue isn’t going to go away on August 1,” spokesperson Laura Peterson said in a statement. “We need and expect Facebook, Inc. to respond to the demands of the #StopHateForProfit campaign. We will follow the lead of our partners behind the campaign.”

Birchbox, through July

The makeup company said in an Instagram post on June 26 that it would cease advertising on Facebook and Instagram during July. Birchbox told Adweek it would reallocate its ad dollars to “other platforms” to “support more individual content creators.” The company will not run ads through FAN, but will continue to post organically on the platform.

Campbell Soup Company, through at least August

The company is suspending social media activity including organic posts and paid advertising on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. “The consumer experience on these social platforms has become increasingly divisive, and we will use this time to reevaluate our advertising standards and association with these platforms to ensure that our brands are not in environments that promote bias, racism or hatred of any kind,” the company told Adweek in a statement on June 30. Campbell didn’t immediately say whether the company will continue to use FAN.

Chipotle, through at least July

“We will continue to be part of the solution to fight systemic racism and create inclusive communities,” Chris Brandt, chief marketing officer at Chipotle, told Adweek in a statement. The company will cease advertising on Facebook and Instagram. The company will continue to post organically, but did not say whether it would continue to use FAN.

Chobani, through July

“Action over advertising,” the company tweeted on June 29, announcing its decision to cease paid advertising on all social channels. The company will still post organically on Facebook and Instagram during July but will not use FAN that month.

The Clorox Company, through the end of 2020

The company will cease spending on Facebook and Instagram, the company said on June 29. “As a people-centered company committed to our values, we feel compelled to take action against hate speech, which we believe will increase through the balance of the year,” Stacey Grier, CMO of The Clorox Company, said in a statement. Grier added that the company will maintain its ad spend but “shift to other media.” The company will not use FAN.

Coca-Cola, through late July

The Coca-Cola Company said in a June 26 statement it will pause all paid social media advertising for the next 30 days to “reassess our advertising policies to determine whether revisions are needed,” according to chairman and CEO James Quincey. Although it did not name any social media platforms in its statement, Quincey said Coca-Cola expects “greater accountability and transparency from our social media partners.”

Its decision is not part of the Stop Hate for Profit boycott campaign. The company did not immediately say whether it would continue to post organically or use FAN.

Conagra Brands, through the end of 2020

The packaged foods company, which includes Slim Jim, Duncan Hines and Vlasic, will stop advertising on Facebook and Instagram in the U.S. through the rest of the year. “We stand by our company values including broadmindedness and integrity and believe there is no place for hate, intolerance and racism in the world or on social media,” a spokesperson said in an email to Adweek on June 29. The company will post organically, but not use FAN.

Consumer Reports

The nonprofit will cease posting paid advertising efforts on Facebook and Instagram, the company told Adweek on June 30. “Facebook must step up and take meaningful action to stop the spread of misinformation and hate speech on its platforms,” it said in a statement. The company did not immediately say whether it would continue to post organically or use FAN.

Danone, indefinitely

Food company Danone is pausing international advertising on Facebook and Instagram, the company told Adweek July 1. While the pause begins July 1, Danone said it will continue until the company feels the two social platforms meet its standards and provide safe environments. The company is not joining the formal boycott, but it “has become clear to us that more needs to be done to combat hate speech and drive sustained systemic change at the industry level,” Gemma Hart, vp of communications and community affairs, Danone North America, said in a statement. The company did not immediately say whether it would continue to post organically or use FAN.

Denny’s, through July

The breakfast chain joined the boycott on June 29, saying it would stop running Facebook and Instagram ads through July. “It is our belief that Facebook has not done enough to address this important issue on its platform and we are calling on Facebook to make positive changes to its process for combatting hate speech and disinformation,” the company said in a statement to Adweek.

Denny’s won’t advertise in third-party apps through Facebook Audience Network, but will continue posting organically on Facebook and Instagram.

Diageo, beginning July 1

The alcohol company, which oversees brands including Smirnoff, Bailey’s, Guinness and Johnnie Walker, said June 27 that it would stop its paid social media advertising efforts internationally beginning July 1 across all major platforms, including Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. “Diageo strives to promote inclusion and diversity, including through our marketing campaigns,” the company said in a tweet. The company does not use FAN.

Eddie Bauer, through July

The clothing company committed to the cause in a Twitter post on June 23, ditching paid ads on Facebook and Instagram during July. It will continue to post organically on the site but not run ads using FAN, a spokesperson confirmed.

Edgewell Personal Care, beginning July 1

The personal care company—with brands including Schick, Wet Ones and Playtex—said June 29 that it would join the boycott and not run ads on Facebook or Instagram, including FAN. The timeline on the boycott is “open-ended.”

“While Mark Zuckerberg’s recently announced changes makes us more hopeful of forthcoming progress, they alone are inadequate in effectively addressing the spread of hate and misinformation,” said president and CEO Rod Little in a LinkedIn post. The company will continue to post organically on Facebook and Instagram.

Ford, through July

The automotive company will pause all national social media advertising in July to “to reevaluate our presence on these platforms,” the company said in a statement to Adweek on June 30. The company will still post organically. It did not say whether it would continue to use those platforms’ ad tech. “We are actively engaged with industry initiatives led by the Association of National Advertisers to drive more accountability, transparency and trusted measurement to clean up the digital and social media ecosystem.”

Habitat for Humanity, through July

The global nonprofit joined the cause, announcing its participation in a Twitter post on June 26. It said it will stop running paid advertising on all “Facebook’s services” during July. The company did not immediately say whether it would continue to post organically or use FAN.

The Hershey Company, through the end of 2020

In an email to Adweek, The Hershey Company said in a statement, first reported by CBS 21 News, “Earlier this month, we communicated to Facebook that we were unhappy with their stance on hate speech. We have now cut our spending on Facebook and their platforms, including Instagram, by a third for the remainder of the year. In addition, we will now join the #StopHateForProfit boycott.” The company did not immediately say whether it would continue to post organically or use FAN.

HP, indefinitely

In a statement on June 29, the tech company said it will remove all U.S. advertising from Facebook until “we see more robust safeguards in place.” The company also said it is “reviewing our social media strategy across all markets and platforms, and we will take additional actions as needed to protect our brand and combat hateful content.”

“This is not only the time to talk, it’s also the time to take some actions,” HP CEO Enrique Lores said in an interview with Yahoo Finance.

“This includes all Facebook properties including Instagram,” said a company spokesperson. “We are also ceasing organic posts and confirming that the action is U.S.-only at this stage.”

JanSport, through July

The backpack producer committed June 26 to not spending with the platform through the end of next month to “join the fight for stricter policies that keep racist, violent and hateful content from proliferating on these platforms,” the company said in a statement on Twitter on June 26. Taking the commitment a step further, the company said it would stop using FAN.

Kimberly-Clark, through July

The manufacturer, with personal care brands such as Kleenex, Cottonelle and Huggies, joined the effort, the company told Adweek on June 30. “Kimberly-Clark is committed to only engaging with media partners that support our values and meet our standards for safety, civility and tolerance,” the company said. It won’t advertise on all Facebook platforms in the U.S. and Canada. It won’t use FAN and is still considering whether to halt organic posts.

Kind Snacks, through July

The snack manufacturer is suspending all advertising on Facebook properties in the U.S. and across 32 countries, the company’s founder, Daniel Lubetzky, announced June 30. In a note to staff, Lubetzky who is also a board member of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), said that Facebook had been overtaken by trolls and that its “algorithms exacerbate division.”

“This must change, for the sake of Facebook regaining its role as a trusted platform, and far more important, for the sake of society,” he said. The company did not immediately say whether it would continue to post organically or use FAN.

The Lego Group, through July

The toy manufacturer will pause all paid ad efforts across international platforms through July, the company said in a statement on June 30. Those marketing dollars will be spent elsewhere. “We are committed to having a positive impact on children and the world they will inherit,” said Julia Goldin, chief marketing officer, in a statement. “That includes contributing to a positive, inclusive digital environment free from hate speech, discrimination and misinformation.” The company did not immediately say whether it would continue to post organically or use FAN.

Levi Strauss & Co., through at least July

The denim clothing company said June 26 that it would suspend its advertising on Facebook and Instagram through at least the end of next month. “We want to see meaningful progress toward ending the amplification of misinformation and hate speech and better addressing of political advertisements and content that contributes to voter suppression,” the company said in a statement, calling Facebook’s efforts so far “not enough.” The company did not immediately say whether it would continue to post organically or use FAN.

Lululemon, through at least July

The athletic apparel company joined the campaign on June 26, pledging to halt paid advertising on Facebook and Instagram in a Twitter post. “As individuals, as leaders and as a company, we believe we all have a responsibility to create a truly inclusive society, and that includes using our brand and our voice to advocate for change.” The company did not immediately say whether it would continue to post organically or use FAN.

Magnolia Pictures, through at least July

The Hollywood studio joined the effort June 23. “We are seeking meaningful change at Facebook and the end to their amplification of hate speech,” the company said in a Twitter post. The company did not immediately say whether it would continue to post organically or use FAN.

Recommended articles