CULVER CITY, CALIF. - Turbo Technologies, the smaller competitor to video game giants Nintendo and Sega, has launched a search for an ad agency as it prepares a" />
CULVER CITY, CALIF. - Turbo Technologies, the smaller competitor to video game giants Nintendo and Sega, has launched a search for an ad agency as it prepares a" /> Six Shops to Play for Turbo Video Game <b>By Kathy Tyre</b><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>CULVER CITY, CALIF. - Turbo Technologies, the smaller competitor to video game giants Nintendo and Sega, has launched a search for an ad agency as it prepares a | Adweek Six Shops to Play for Turbo Video Game <b>By Kathy Tyre</b><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>CULVER CITY, CALIF. - Turbo Technologies, the smaller competitor to video game giants Nintendo and Sega, has launched a search for an ad agency as it prepares a | Adweek
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Six Shops to Play for Turbo Video Game By Kathy Tyre

CULVER CITY, CALIF. - Turbo Technologies, the smaller competitor to video game giants Nintendo and Sega, has launched a search for an ad agency as it prepares a

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A company spokesperson confirmed that Turbo has invited six small-to-midsized local shops to compete for its estimated $4-million account, including incumbent Asatsu/L.A., an affiliate of BBDO, which helped Turbo launch its CD video-game player in L.A. last year. The Turbo executive declined to name the agencies in the pitch.
If the name Turbo sounds unfamiliar, it's because the company is the result of the April 1992 merger between Boxboro, Mass.-based NEC Technologies' home electronics division and Hudsonsoft, the Japanese firm that makes its software.
In October, Turbo, a distant runnerup to Nintendo and Sega in the video-game market, introduced its sophisticated Turbo Duo CD player in Los Angeles.
Sega also introduced its CD game player during the past holiday season.
Nintendo last fall announced a joint venture with Sony that includes plans to introduce a CD game player this year.
Sega's $300 system, supported with a $50-60 million advertising campaign from Goodby, Berlin & Silverstein/S.F., was an immediate sell-out.
Whereas Sega's ad campaign targets the typical, teenage video-game player, one source said Turbo is expected to go after an older audience with its advertising.
The Turbo executive said the company will select an agency 'within weeks.'
Copyright Adweek L.P. (1993)