Rollerblade, Minneapolis, is testing its first-ever TV spot in six markets, hoping to get a jump on the season when most in-line skates are bought - spring and " />


Rollerblade, Minneapolis, is testing its first-ever TV spot in six markets, hoping to get a jump on the season when most in-line skates are bought - spring and " /> EXPERIENCE ROLLERBLADE <br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>Rollerblade, Minneapolis, is testing its first-ever TV spot in six markets, hoping to get a jump on the season when most in-line skates are bought - spring and | Adweek EXPERIENCE ROLLERBLADE <br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>Rollerblade, Minneapolis, is testing its first-ever TV spot in six markets, hoping to get a jump on the season when most in-line skates are bought - spring and | Adweek
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Rollerblade, Minneapolis, is testing its first-ever TV spot in six markets, hoping to get a jump on the season when most in-line skates are bought - spring and

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The spot, titled, 'Amish,' focuses on the experience of skating on Rollerblade in-line skates, rather than a specific product. The ad opens with a serene montage of golden wheat fields and deep blue skies and eventually focuses on a lone young man skating down an isolated paved road. As the skater glides along, he passes an Amish buggy traveling in the opposite direction. As he passes the buggy, the skater looks back and makes eye contact with young Amish child. The tag states, 'There are but a few ways to separate yourself from this hectic world.'
The spot, created by Carmichael Lynch Advertising, Minneapolis, will air during prime time, prime access and late night fringe. Previously, CL had created an award-winning print campaign, which is currently running.
Copyright Adweek L.P. (1993)