Pinterest Fielded More Requests for User Information in the First Half of 2017

Pinterest did not receive any requests for information from non-U.S. government entities

Pinterest released its Transparency Report for the first half of 2017 last Friday.

The social network received a total of 78 requests for information from law enforcement in the U.S. from January through March of this year—37 subpoenas, two court orders and 39 warrants.

For the 37 subpoenas, some information was produced on 33, and they involved 42 accounts, 18 of which were notified.

Some information was provided on both court orders, which covered two accounts, and neither of the account holders was notified.

And the 39 warrants all resulted in some information being produced, involving a total of 42 accounts, 22 of which were notified.

In contrast, from January through March 2016, Pinterest fielded just six requests for information from law enforcement in the U.S.—five subpoenas and one court order.

From April through June 2017, 22 subpoenas from law enforcement in the U.S. led to information being produced on 21. They covered 24 accounts, with eight of those account holders being notified.

Pinterest also received 20 warrants and provided information on 19 of those, regarding 20 accounts, five of which were notified. The social network did not receive any court orders from April through June.

In the same months of 2016, Pinterest received eight subpoenas from law enforcement in the U.S., one court order and nine warrants.

Pinterest did not receive any requests for information from non-U.S. government entities.

The social network received 124 government content removal requests in the first six months of 2017, all from Russia and South Korea, and it complied with all of them.

Pinterest received just two government content removal requests from January through June 2016, both from the U.S., and it did not comply with either.

A wrap-up of Pinterest’s Transparency Report for the second half of 2016 is available here.