Mobile Game Roundup: Groove Planet, Speed Golf and More

We take a look at some of the mobile games released this week.

Are you looking for a new mobile game to play this weekend? There are plenty of new options available, starting with Sniper Fury, a first-person shooter from Gameloft. The game’s single-player missions see users travel around the world to defeat enemies, while a multiplayer mode allows players to manage the defenses of their own base, and attack bases owned by other users.

Ubisoft also released its newest game this week: Rayman Adventures. The level-based side-scrolling platformer challenges players to collect creatures called Incrediballs in order to regrow a Sacred Tree.

Are you looking for something different to play? Here’s a look at some of the additional mobile games released this week.

Groove Planet (Free on iOS) – This rhythm-based ‘clicker’ or idle game from Animoca Brands allows players to build an alien planet by collecting and spending music notes, but instead of rapidly tapping to earn currency, the game encourages users to tap in time to the beat of the music (rapidly tapping is technically allowed, but players earn more notes by tapping to the beat). Gamers can play the game with music previewed from iTunes, or play the music on their device. As players collect music notes, these can be spent on upgrades to make each tap worth more notes, or on buildings which generate music notes automatically over time, even when gamers aren’t tapping or actively playing the game. Groove Planet will launch on Android next year.

TruckSimulation 16 ($2.99 on iOS, Android) – A truck driving simulation game from developer kunst-stoff and publisher astragon Entertainment, TruckSimulation 16 allows players to collect seven trucks and complete delivery orders by driving on roads across central and western Europe. Players have access to eight trailer types, which are designed to transport different objects (like bulk goods or hazardous liquids, as examples). The game allows players to travel to more than 20 cities, and players can hire AI drivers to complete additional delivery missions.

Pro Pinball

Pro Pinball ($2.99 on Android) – Following a successful Kickstarter campaign, Barnstorm Games has released Pro Pinball: Timeshock on Android devices. Based on the Pro Pinball series from the 1990s, the app features worldwide score leaderboards, as well as ambient lighting controls. For an additional $3.99, players can upgrade to the ‘Deluxe’ version of the app, which supports table customization via an Operator’s Menu, as well as a ‘Glass-Off Mode,’ which allows players to manually move the ball around the table.

Rush N Krush

Rush N Krush (Free on iOS, Android) – From Netmarble Games, this arcade-style racing game offers multiple gameplay modes, including an endless racing mode and a boss mode for taking down bosses using a vehicle’s weapons. The game also includes head-to-head, grand prix and friendly match multiplayer modes. While racing, players tap on buttons to steer and jump, and can drift behind other cars for a speed boost. While playing endless games, these games continue until players run out of gas (players earn extra gas as they reach checkpoints). Players can collect parts and upgrade their cars, and can also unlock new drivers over time.

Kash Karnival (Free on iOS) – Originally released on Facebook, Kash Karnival from Royal Wins is a skill-based casino game, allowing players to bet on their in-game performance, and redeem their winnings for real-world prizes including iPads and GoPro cameras, among others. The game offers both skill-based mini-games (like one similar to Flappy Bird, for instance), as well as traditional casino games (like a slot machine). Gamers level up as they play games, and will unlock new games to play over time.

Sequence: Connecting Numbers (Free on iOS) – This puzzle game from developer ZipZap Games and publisher Gameblyr challenges players to complete over 100 levels by connecting numbers to form chains based on patterns. Each level has a different goal, like removing enough numbers to add up to a specific total, or collecting objects by removing all of the numbers below them, as examples. Gamers can use power-ups to complete stages.