Microsoft Reports That Malware Attacks on Social Networking are Mounting

The first class of cyber criminals use advanced techniques such as social engineering and rare malware exploits to attack large organizations or individuals. The second class uses widely known cyber attacks like clickjacking and phishing to attack a wider user base on social networking platforms, which means anyone or everyone.

Microsoft released a report for social media users about the mounting threat of malware attacks occurring on popular social networking platforms. The warning was announced via Microsoft’s new Microsoft Security Intelligence Report. In the report, it states cyber criminals have slowly branched out into two camps.

The first class of cyber criminals use advanced techniques such as social engineering and rare malware exploits to attack large organizations or individuals. The second class uses widely known cyber attacks like clickjacking and phishing to attack a wider user base on social networking platforms, which means anyone or everyone.

Microsoft released a statement saying, “We’re seeing these attacks run more like marketing campaigns, and especially during significant events that attract media attention, such as the disaster in Japan.”

Rather than taking part in large attacks like espionage or extortion, cyber criminals are now focused on devising small attacks on a large number of people. Such attacks for a while make the entire operation undetectable.

Microsoft’s report was founded on information culled from more than 600 million Windows PCs worldwide. The report stated that Microsoft effectively detected and blocked fake antivirus attacks on 19 million PCs worldwide.

Known fake antiviruses, FakeSpypro and FakePAV, were the two most popular fake antiviruses that targeted Windows systems worldwide.

Also announced was pesky adware is back. ClickPotato pushes ads based on a user’s browsing habits, while PornPop pushes adult content. Most likely, they are not doing anything malicious.

I am not too familiar with adware, but I have noticed malware attacks on Facebook that were easily handled by deleting the fake invites to a phishing attack. The malware attacks have yet to hurt me. The only thing they mess up is my time.