LinkedIn’s Transparency Report for 1H 2019 Includes Its First Ever Community Report

Data is provided on fake accounts, spam/scams and content removed for violating policies

LinkedIn's new Community Report
LinkedIn

LinkedIn stopped 19.5 million fake accounts during the process of registration in the first half of 2019, the professional network said in its biannual Transparency Report, released this week.

Another 2 million were restricted proactively before being reported by members, while members’ reports were responsible for the removal of another 67,400.

LinkedIn said 60.4 million instances of spam and scams were removed proactively from January through June of this year, with another 104,600 pulled after being reported by members.

As far as violations of the professional network’s community policies, 16,626 pieces of content were removed for harassment, followed by adult content (11,019), violent or graphic content (1,933), hate speech (1,637) and child exploitation (22).

LinkedIn received 8,845 requests to remove a total of 116,164 pieces of content for copyright infringement, and it acted on all but 37 of those pieces of content.

The professional network shared the information above for the first time in its debut Community Report, and vice president, legal, product and privacy Rob Hallman said in a blog post, “We’re including this new report to provide more visibility into how we enforce our professional community policies and address activity and content that isn’t allowed on our platform … Our responsibility doesn’t end with reporting on policy violations and prohibited activity; we’re also focused on building the tools and teams to effectively prevent or quickly stop them, and on providing the safe, professional community our members expect.”

The professional network received 362 government requests for data worldwide in the first half of 2019, with 314 of those coming from the U.S., up from 247 and 203, respectively, in the second half of 2018.

The most requests from outside of the U.S. came from Germany (nine), Brazil (eight) and France (six).

The professional network received just eight government requests for content removal in the first six months of the year, taking action on all of them.

Three of those requests came from China, two from Turkey and one apiece from Canada, Germany and Saudi Arabia.

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