Facebook Examined the Consumer Journey of Console Game Buyers

The majority of 18- to 34-year-olds surveyed said the social network's apps help them discover new titles

Downloadable content for console games can sometimes help players better represent themselves in-game
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In an effort to help marketers understand the consumer journey when it comes to purchasing console video games, Facebook IQ, the social network’s research arm, commissioned Accenture to survey 1,000 people in the U.S. ages 18 and over. The survey data (from November 2018) revealed that there are three major trends affecting the console gaming space today: social players, community purpose and gaming inclusivity.

First, the survey found that social play and social networks help gamers discover new games to play. Specifically, 70% of 18- to 34-year-olds said they were “open to playing new console game genres when playing with friends or family.”

In addition, 64% of 18- to 34-year-olds in the survey said playing games with friends, or meeting new people, is “what makes gaming great.”

Facebook IQ

Finally, more than one-half (51%) of 18- to 34-year-olds agreed that Facebook and other social networking sites are “great ways to learn about new games,” with 57% of respondents in that age group saying that Facebook’s family of applications “helps them discover new console games.”

The survey also examined how console game buyers interact with the video gaming community online. 49% percent of 18- 34-year-olds said they were “more likely to keep playing a game if they feel like part of a community related to it.”

Facebook IQ

In some good news for brands, 94% of 18- to 34-year-olds surveyed said they were open to being interacted with by brands or retailers through an online gaming group or community. Finally, 45% of console gaming buyers said they would be more interested in joining online groups or communities that were started by a console game brand, franchise or retailer if they offered gaming tips and tricks to help them improve their experience.

Lastly, the survey looked at how diversity and inclusion are impacting console gaming.

First, it showed that female game buyers were more likely to turn to social influences when making a decision to try a new game. Specifically, 69% “follow recommendations from friends and family,” 58% are influenced by people “talking about [a game] a lot online” and 46% “take advice from groups and communities.”

Facebook IQ

Finally, downloadable content for console games can sometimes help players better represent themselves in-game: 42% percent of 18- to 34-year-olds who bought DLC in the past six months said the purchase “helped them to customize game features, such as their costume.”

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