Children’s Social Network Everloop Raises $3.1 Million

Everloop allows kids to develop their creative skills by customizing their own user profiles, connect with friends and stay productive by choosing from over 1,500 games to entertain themselves. As a harmless alternative to cyberbullying, the site allows users to trick one another with “Goobs,” painless game using toilet paper rolls or virtual pies that are thrown at one another.

A social network group for kids under 13 called Everloop has raised $3.1 million in funding from various investors and investing groups. Everloop services youngsters, who are too young for Facebook, and complies with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act.

Everloop allows kids to develop their creative skills by customizing their own user profiles, connect with friends and stay productive by choosing from over 1,500 games to entertain themselves. As a harmless alternative to cyberbullying, the site allows users to trick one another with “Goobs,” painless game using toilet paper rolls or virtual pies that are thrown at one another.

The site’s Mod Squad keeps their eyes on the lookout for any inappropriate content too. So, kids just have fun and don’t need to deal with cyberbullies or bad language. Parents can monitor their child’s account with the ability to turn off or on certain features, such as chat and email. I am sure monitoring is a good application, but sometimes it seems more like being my daughter’s secretary, forwarding her messages or email.

Along with the new funding, Everloop also made some executive appointments. The appointments are quite impressive. Sandy Barger, formerly with Walt Disney Studios, is now chief marketing officer. Tobin Trevarthen, formerly in sales at Time Warner and AOL, is vice president of business development. And Alan Goodman, who has an extensive career in small and big media since the 1980s, is now Eveloop’s creative advisor.

Creating a popular social network for kids under 13 will prove to be a monetary success as well as a relief to parents at large. And with that, I am curious to see how Facebook responds to the creation of sites like Everloop. Will the largest social network change its operating policies and become kid friendly?