Google Pixel’s Pride Ad Promotes Phone’s Kiss-Detection Feature

Campaign comes as Google finds itself in hot water ahead of San Francisco’s Pride parade

Google's Pixel shows off kiss-detection capabilities in its Pride-themed campaign.
Google

Google recently unveiled a new feature on its Pixel 3 phone: “kiss detection,” which automatically snaps a photo when it can sense two people attempting to take a kissing pic.

Pixel is showing off this feature in a Pride campaign that shows photos and videos of LGBT couples using the built-in kiss cam. The upbeat ad is set to the tune of “Then He Kissed Me” by The Crystals.

The effort follows a project Google launched earlier this month in honor of Pride. To mark the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots in New York City, which sparked the modern fight for LGBT rights, Google provided a $1.5 million grant to the LGBT Community Center of New York City to create Stonewall Forever, an interactive “living monument” that contains digitized historical artifacts, oral histories capturing the early days of the movement, interviews with new voices of LGBTQ equality and more.

According to the company, volunteers from Google Creative Lab helped bring the experience to life. The idea for the online hub was inspired by the 2016 designation of Christopher Park—which sits across from the Stonewall Inn—as the first national monument dedicated to LGBT rights.

Yet Google’s various Pride efforts come as the company attempts to curb fallout from YouTube’s LGBT policies. Earlier this month, the Google-owned site came under fire for its handling of conservative comedian and commentator Steven Crowder’s homophobic jokes in videos. While YouTube blocked advertising on Crowder’s channel, it still kept his clips up, stating that his comments didn’t violate its policies.

Ahead of San Francisco’s Pride parade this weekend, Google is now reportedly warning employees to not protest against the internet giant at official company events during celebrations.

Recommended videos