Social Media Newsfeed: NSA Transparency | David Karp on Colbert

Major Internet, Social Media Companies Ask Feds to Let Them Report National Security Requests (SocialTimes) Today, more than five-dozen Internet companies, including the major Silicon Valley players, will ask the government to allow them to release information to users about the national security requests they’ve handled, according to a report in AllThingsD. The companies signing on to the request include Google, Facebook, Apple, LinkedIn, Twitter, Yahoo, AOL, Digg, Dropbox, Meetup, Mozilla, Reddit, Salesforce, Tumblr and The Wikimedia Foundation.

[emailonly]{{{ sbox300x250 }}}[/emailonly]

 Click here to receive the Morning Social Media Newsfeed via email.

NSA SurveillanceMajor Internet, Social Media Companies Ask Feds to Let Them Report National Security Requests (SocialTimes)
Tuesday, more than five-dozen Internet companies, including the major Silicon Valley players, will ask the government to allow them to release information to users about the national security requests they’ve handled, according to a report on AllThingsD. The companies signing on to the request include Google, Facebook, Apple, LinkedIn, Twitter, Yahoo, AOL, Digg, Dropbox, Meetup, Mozilla, Reddit, Salesforce, Tumblr and The Wikimedia Foundation. AllThingsD The alliance — whose members include 63 companies, investors, nonprofits and trade organizations — will call upon President Obama and congressional leaders to allow Internet, telephone and Web-based service providers to regularly report the number of government requests for information about their users, the number of individuals, accounts, or devices for which information was requested, and the number of requests that sought communications content, basic subscriber information, and/or other information. CNET Legally barred from discussing their participation in the program, Google and Microsoft have petitioned the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to lift a gag order prohibiting them from disclosing more information about government requests they receive for customer data. To date, the companies have released only totals that combine legal requests made under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act with others related to criminal investigations involving fraud, homicide and kidnapping, making it impossible to determine how many FISA requests they have received. The Guardian The National Security Agency revealed to an angry congressional panel on Wednesday that its analysis of phone records and online behavior goes exponentially beyond what it had previously disclosed. John C. Inglis, deputy director of the surveillance agency, told a member of the House judiciary committee that NSA analysts can perform “a second or third hop query” through its collections of telephone data and Internet records in order to find connections to terrorist organizations. The Atlantic Wire The hearing was far more critical of the government than previous hearings have been. Members of the House from both political parties had strong words for the agency representatives, often focused on how the letter of the law had been exploited.

David Karp Tells Stephen Colbert Tumblr Won’t ‘Police’ Porn (Mashable)
David Karp continued his post-Tumblr acquisition publicity tour Tuesday with his appearance on The Colbert Report. During the six-minute interview, host Stephen Colbert asked Karp about his decision to drop out of high school, whether Yahoo purchased Tumblr for its cool factor (“I hope not,” he said) and even what he would do if the National Security Agency approached him. But one answer in particular may disappoint one of Karp and Yahoo’s key audiences: advertisers. TechCrunch After Colbert referred to Tumblr as “porn central,” Karp responded that “it’s got everything!” – a phrase Colbert then repeated to comedic effect. “There’s a lot of everything on there,” he deadpanned. BetaBeat “We’ve taken a pretty hard line on freedom of speech, supporting our users, creation on whatever that looks like,” he mumbled, “But it’s something we don’t want to police.” YOLO, indeed. The Huffington Post Tumblr apologized on Tuesday for a major security glitch that exposed blogger passwords and email addresses. In a post on the official staff Tumblr, Derek Gottfrid announced a huge security issue with Tumblr’s apps for the iPhone and iPad.

Infographic: 9 Steps Toward Facebook Graph Search Optimization (AllFacebook)
With Facebook’s Graph Search rolling out to users in the United States, it’s time for page administrators to start thinking about how their pages can best take advantage of the opportunities presented by the new feature. A local business marketing services provider with a fantastic name, Right On — No Bull Marketing — shared this infographic, featuring nine steps toward Facebook Graph Search optimization.