iBooks Versus iTunes

Even though the iPad is really great for consuming content, making a book for iBooks has been relatively static for most book makers. While iBooks 2 lets publishers add interactive features to digital textbooks, many eBook publishers that want to get interactive and create richer experiences have had to create apps.

Unfortunately, it often works out that apps, which can be more expensive to make, sell for much less than books, which are arguably cheaper to create. Fast Company raises this issue with book packager Ellen Jacob. Jacob tells the magazine: “Apple’s approach doesn’t allow many interactions in e-books. You can put in an entire movie but you can’t put in something that makes kids read deeper. What’s the sense in that?”

Where do you sell your interactive eBooks — iBooks or iTunes? Why?