7 Ways Brands Can Win on Amazon This Holiday Season

These ad strategies will make brands stand out on the platform

Amazon boxes with yellow ribbons
Most consumers will use Amazon this holiday season—here's how to reach them.
Amazon

It probably won’t come as a surprise that digital marketing agency Tinuiti found 82% of consumers plan to use Amazon in some capacity to shop online for holiday gifts this year. It is, after all, the Everything Store.

Tinuiti’s research also found Amazon is consumers’ preferred starting point for holiday shopping—so much so that it beats out individual brand sites by a factor of four. The result: A presence on Amazon is “all but mandatory,” according to the report.

Here’s a closer look at how exactly brands can connect with holiday shoppers on Amazon during this frenzied season of gifts, food and décor:

Start early

According to Mark Irvine, director of strategic partnerships at search marketing company WordStream, an early start is important—particularly in 2019, when there are six fewer days between Black Friday and Christmas than the year prior.

“That lost week makes every day more valuable, and you’ll have to set aside more aggressive daily budgets to get the same return,” he said. (Although, to be fair, during Amazon’s Q3 earnings call, CFO Brian Olsavsky said he didn’t think the shorter season “is going to be that impactful” in part because consumers are more comfortable placing later orders thanks to advancements in one-day shipping.)

Regardless, brands have to be at the ready from about October onward: Amazon has specific deadlines for when products need to be in its warehouses and available for holiday shipping, so Jon Maxson, senior director of SEO at digital marketing agency iCrossing, said that’s “definitely something that brands have to plan ahead for.”

Elizabeth Marsten, senior director of strategic marketplace services at Tinuiti, said her agency advises clients to offer Lightning Deals (promotions offered in limited quantities for a short period of time) along with Black Friday deals, but the deadline has already passed for those submissions. Moving forward, she said brands should note to plan their holiday season strategy a “good couple of months in advance.”

Similarly, Tinuiti recommended setting budgets “at least a few months ahead of time” and getting creative approved “well before Q4 kicks off,” as well as to review Q4 results after the fact to record takeaways for 2020.

Be ‘retail ready’

In addition, Marsten said brands must be “Amazon retail ready.” That means having:

  • Competitive prices
  • Products in stock
  • Two-day fulfillment through either Amazon or their own means
  • Onsite history, like pageviews, clickthrough rates (CTR) from the search engine results page (SERP), and sales figures for each product
  • Increased bids ahead of peak shopping moments so their products are discoverable and their chances of winning the Buy Box are higher
  • Sufficient budget for the products and campaigns that matter

According to Tinuiti, being retail ready also helps brands secure prime ad placements and increase return on ad spend (ROAS).

“The more retail ready a brand’s products are, the more likely they will convert … which, in turn, improves advertising conversion rate, which helps with getting better ad placements on Amazon,” said Leo Carrillo, associate director of Amazon and Marketplace growth at Tinuiti. “Retail readiness also helps improve ROAS because if a brand’s product conversion rate improves, advertising conversion rate will increase, too,” meaning it takes fewer clicks to get a sale.

The more retail ready a brand's products are, the more likely they will convert … which, in turn improves advertising conversion rate, which helps with getting better ad placements on Amazon.
Leo Carillo

Get your copy in the holiday spirit

Maxson also recommended changing ad copy and product page copy to incorporate gift-giving language and the benefits of a given product—for the giver and recipient.

“For example, givers search for ‘unique’ gifts and other types of qualifiers that speak to the mindset of the shopper, while searchers are increasingly refining queries to meet hyper-specific needs related to the recipient’s age and interests,” he said.

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