How To Keep Facebook From Ruining Your Vacation

The more work- and school-related pages get us to click like, the greater the potential for non-vacation content to stream our way when we're trying to enjoy time off.

The more work- and school-related pages get us to click like, the greater the potential for non-vacation content to stream our way when we’re trying to enjoy time off.

Of course, not logging on to Facebook while on vacation eliminates the need to temporarily unsubscribe to any profiles and pages that remind us of work or school.

That requires willpower, especially because vacation is a time when we want to gloat share photos and updates with friends outside of work or school, and Facebook provides the most convenient way to do that.

Unless you’re vacationing somewhere that your cellular service provider doesn’t reach, the temptation to log onto Facebook during vacation will be impossible to overcome. We suggest you not fight that urge to show off travel photos in real time. Instead, unsubscribe to things — even the pages you administer yourself — and resubscribe when you get back.

You can simplify this with friend lists: Unsubscribe to everyone on the smart list that Facebook creates for your current place of employment or school you attend.

Even if these folks don’t have the subscribe button on their profiles, you can still choose not to see status updates from them while you’re on vacation. You can navigate to a page that will show you the list by typing the name of the list, employer, or school. Then in the upper-right portion of the screen, click on the “manage list” box, and select “choose update types.” Uncheck everything listed in the pull-down menu.

Of course, that pull-down menu also includes the option to delete the list, but that won’t unfriend the people contained therein. In fact, there’s really no need to completely drop any contacts just because you’re going away — or for any reason. Hide them, or rather, hide their posts. When you get back, you can unhide them. While they’re hidden, they’ll be able to see the vacation photos you upload showing off your travels. Why travel somewhere exotic if you can’t boast about it later?

And that reminds us: If your vacation plan involves something that you might not want everyone on your contact list to see, make use of the privacy settings when you share photos and post status updates. The microsharing settings on the site default to the same level of visibility you used for your last post, which can be a time savings or a nuisance, depending on the context.

Readers, how are you using Facebook on your vacation — or not?

AllFacebook edited an image from Shutterstock.