Sued By Facebook? Change Your Name To Mark Zuckerberg

Believe it or not, someone exists with a shakier legal strategy against Facebook than Paul Ceglia: Israeli entrepreneur and Like Store Co-Founder Rotem Guez, who responded to a lawsuit from the social network by changing his name to Mark Zuckerberg.

Believe it or not, someone exists with a shakier legal strategy against Facebook than Paul Ceglia: Israeli entrepreneur and Like Store Co-Founder Rotem Guez, who responded to a lawsuit from the social network by changing his name to Mark Zuckerberg.

Guez created a website to tell his story, Will Facebook Sue Mark Zuckerberg, with the URL markzuckerbergofficial.com. We’re waiting for him to change his dog’s name to Beast.

The story from Guez: He filed a lawsuit against Facebook and its Israeli affiliate, Nana10 MASA, January 29, after the social network refused to return his hacked profile. Who knew that selling likes and creating fake accounts could get you kicked off Facebook?

Facebook and law firm Perkins Coie responded with a cease-and-desist letter Sept. 1, claiming that Guez and Like Store violated its terms of service by selling advertisers fans for their pages, demanding that Guez shutter the company and never access Facebook again.

On December 7, Guez legally changed his name to Mark Zuckerberg, in the hopes that Facebook would back off its lawsuit in order to avoid the publicity of suing someone with the same name as its co-founder and chief executive officer. Seriously?

Facebook sent a second letter threatening legal action December 14, but the letter was sent to Guez, and not Mark Zuckerberg. Boy, he really fooled them!

Guez also created a page called I’m Mark Zuckerberg Facebook page, which has actually drawn more than 5,100 likes, and a Twitter account with the handle iMarkZuckerberg (only a little over 2,600 followers — maybe he should change his name again, to Biz Stone).

We guess he ran out of steam before getting to Google Plus.

Facebook’s public response was the drab statement below. The private response likely involved a lot of guffawing.

Protecting the people who use Facebook is a top priority, and we will take action against those who violate our terms.

Readers: Are you shaking your head as much as we are?