Entertainment Weekly Publishes First Monthly Issue, Featuring Its Biggest Redesign Ever

'We’re trying to use every platform in its best way,' said new editor JD Heyman

Animated gif of Entertainment Weekly covers featuring CW superheroes Supergirl played by Melissa Benoist, Green Arrow played by Stephen Amell, Batwoman played by Ruby Rose, The Flash played by Grant Gustin and White Canary played by Caity Lotz.
The inaugural monthly issue features five different cover images, each with a separate superhero from The CW.
Carlos Serrao for EW

The first issue of the newly redesigned, now monthly Entertainment Weekly was released today, featuring DC superheroes from The CW on the cover. The new, bigger magazine also has new feature spreads with the biggest redesign in the magazine’s history, with a new font and design.

The inaugural monthly issue has five different cover images, each with a separate CW superhero: Arrow, Supergirl, The Flash, Batwoman and Sara Lance (from DC’s Legends of Tomorrow).

JD Heyman—who was named EW’s new editor in chief last month, just as the publication unveiled its switch from a weekly to a monthly publication—says the new magazine will have “richer” storytelling and more in-depth coverage, including stories about Hollywood true crime and more stories written by industry heavyweights.

“We’re trying to use every platform in its best way. Sometimes when something new comes along, we rush to make everything a cheap version of whatever we try to copy. We’re getting back to the basics in every platform,” Heyman said.

Entertainment Weekly page layout featuring Greg Berlanti.
The new 'Meet Your Maker' feature
Provided by EW

Every page has been redesigned, the magazine’s “The Must List” roundup of top media picks has been revamped and the front of the book was reimagined, including a new section that will aggregate all the first looks featured in that particular issue. The redesign was done in-house under Heyman, and led by executive editor Tim Leong, design director Jennie Chang and the creative team.

In reimagining the magazine, Heyman said he thought about what he, too, would want to see after reading Entertainment Weekly since childhood. “If we believe in editors at all, we have to believe in their taste,” Heyman said.

EW’s redesign is part of an overarching, “evolutionary” change for the brand, which relocated its headquarters to L.A. from New York in 2017. Heyman, formerly deputy editor of People, moved to EW last month, replacing the exiting Henry Goldblatt.

The new magazine is also adding other sections, like “Meet Your Maker,” in which an industry creative discusses their biggest influences and “Blast from the EW Past,” which brings back former EW writers to share their favorite all-time picks. In this issue, for instance, AJ Jacobs wrote about his favorite books.

Entertainment Weekly page layout
The new 'Blast from the EW Past' feature
Provided by EW

“Anything that has to do with the history of the industry and the inside story about the great people and stories is of interest to me. There will probably be more of that in the new EW than the old EW,” Heyman said.

This latest issue is physically bigger, at 112 pages, than the previous July 5 issue, which had 48 pages. The number of ad pages in this newest issue also increased to 21 pages over the 13 ad pages that were in the July 5 issue. The magazine will continue to cost $6.99.

The new monthly magazine will print at least 12 times per year, with special issues devoted to covering big industry events.

Heyman hopes that the magazine will have some staying power and can serve as a centerpiece on one’s coffee table or as a collector’s item. “When things are disposable,” he said, “we’re devaluing the proposition of the value proposition.”