Ikea Canada Wants to Buy Your Furniture on Black Friday

It's the retailer's latest commitment to sustainability

Photo of an Ikea bookshelf
Ikea wants to inspire more sustainable living through #BuybackFriday. Ikea
Headshot of Emmy Liederman

Ikea wants to show its customers that old furniture deserves more than one life. Its latest campaign features the adventures of a single white bookshelf, which has made its way into different homes across multiple generations, housing trophies, CD players and disco balls.

On Black Friday this year, Ikea Canada is encouraging customers to trade in their gently-used Ikea furniture for double the sell-back value through in-store credit. They can earn up to $150 when they bring in an old Billy Bookcase, which is the face of this campaign.

#BuyBackFriday is the latest initiative that aligns with Ikea’s promise to become fully circular and climate positive by 2030. The retailer is focused on using renewable and recyclable materials while encouraging customers to “give furniture a second chance” by reducing the amount of furniture that is thrown away each year. 

“On one of the biggest shopping days of the year, we want to change the conversation from one of mass consumption to mass circularity, and show how sustainable living can be easy and affordable for everyone,” Melissa Barbosa, Ikea Canada’s head of sustainability, said in a statement.

The Black Friday event is an opportunity for customers to increase their earnings through Ikea Canada’s Sell-Back Program, which launched in 2019. The brand has made significant strides in sustainability this year by rolling out its own plant-based meat and implementing an experiential marketing campaign with Vox Creative that put customers’ knowledge to the test while encouraging more eco-friendly habits.

Ikea’s has put sustainability front and center as its brand purpose. In January, the retailer released a series of “Why We Make” ads, establishing its responsibility as a retail giant to protect the Earth and its resources.

Sustainability efforts from retailers like Ikea have made an impression on consumers who are becoming increasingly environmentally conscious, and nearly two-thirds of senior executives reported that these initiatives boost revenue, according to a July study from global consulting firm Capgemini.

Ikea Canada wants every consumer to commit to “one little thing” that could help protect the earth. In addition to buying back old furniture on Black Friday, the retailer is innovating products that save water, energy and waste, as well as educating its customers on extending the life cycle of secondhand furniture.

“Every year, Ikea products and services are part of millions of Canadians homes and we have a responsibility to support our customers to live a better everyday life within the limits of our planet through affordable, straightforward solutions,” Barbosa said in a statement.


Emmy is a senior journalism major at The College of New Jersey with minors in Spanish and broadcast journalism. She has previously worked as editor-in-chief of her college newspaper, The Signal, as well as an intern at Tribune Publishing Company. Emmy is looking forward to contributing to Adweek as an intern working with its breaking news and audience engagement teams.
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