After 12 Years as a Digital Prophet, David Shing Is Moving on From Verizon Media

'Futurist' was one of the media industry's most recognizable figures

david shingy verizon media aol conference speaker
The Australian-born executive announced his departure in a heartfelt LinkedIn note.
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It what many would deem the end of an era, David Shing, better known as “Shingy” or “the digital prophet” of Verizon Media, has left the company after a more than 10-year run that saw him become one of the most recognized faces in the industry.

The Australian-born executive, who has held several top-tier marketing roles at Verizon Media through the telco-owned agency’s various corporate evolutionary stages since 2007, confirmed his exit by way of a LinkedIn parting note entitled “Today marks new adventures.” His exit from Verizon Media is of his own volition and not part of a wider overhaul of senior-level executives there, according to a source.

A Verizon spokesperson declined to comment further about the resignation.

While the exact directives of his role as a self-proclaimed “digital prophet” have always been somewhat vague, they’re best described as looking around corners for all areas of the business. The self-penned post did not outline the specifics of his future ventures, although Shing did note he would be “working autonomously with brands to help them achieve optimal presence in the marketplace.”

He also credited fatherhood—Shing became a parent in 2017—as a “transformational experience” that “highlighted the passion I have for helping things grow and seeing them thrive.”

He continues, “We inhabit a pivotal time at which much is at stake in how we practice media and marketing. I’ve had a rare privilege of speaking into the soul of our industry (as a futurist) … and I believe it’s a critical time to preserve the tenants [sic] of human dignity, creativity and compassion as we engage the thrilling opportunities at hand.”

Shingy held roles for AOL Europe before expanding into new geographies, including North America, when he became a contributor to Adweek and a highly recognizable figure on the U.S. speaking circuit where his extroverted persona, unorthodox appearance and offbeat verbal delivery made him stand out among conference presenters.