Glassdoor Rolls Out New Features to Rate Companies on Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

Salesforce came out on top among 12 companies where its rating was tested in stealth mode

Glassdoor's new FAQ resource contains a list of the most popular questions job seekers ask about diversity at companies Glassdoor
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Job insights platform Glassdoor rolled out three new features Wednesday aimed at giving its users a clearer picture of diversity, equity and inclusion at companies they are searching.

The Harris Poll conducted a survey for Glassdoor of job seekers and employees to learn more about their perceptions of diversity, equity and inclusion in the workplace, and its findings included:

  • Nearly one-half of Black (47%) and Hispanic (49%) respondents quit their jobs after witnessing or experiencing discrimination at work, compared with just 38% of white respondents.
  • 32% of respondents said they would not apply at a company with a lack of diversity among its workforce (41% of Blacks and 30% of whites).
  • 63% of respondents believe their employers should be doing more to increase diversity, with 71% of Black respondents feeling that way, 72% of Hispanics and 58% of whites.

Glassdoor responded by introducing new tools that enable employers to share their related commitments, programs and goals, including a dedicated section on their Glassdoor profiles where they can share their current demographic information.

The highlight of the three new features rolled out by Glassdoor Wednesday is the Diversity & Inclusion Rating, which became the sixth workplace factor rating available to employees.

Ratings are based on a five-point scale and appear alongside the five existing workplace factor ratings.

Glassdoor said employees across 12 companies had access to the Diversity & Inclusion Rating while it was in stealth mode, and this is how ratings turned out for those companies:

Glassdoor

U.S.-based employees and job seekers can now voluntarily and anonymously share their demographic information in order to help other Glassdoor users determine whether companies are actually delivering on their commitments.

That information includes disability status, gender identity, parental status, race/ethnicity and sexual orientation.

Glassdoor

Glassdoor said it will soon display company ratings, workplace factor ratings, salary reports and more, broken out by specific groups at specific companies, in order to equip employers with further data and insights to create and sustain more equitable workplaces.

Finally, Glassdoor rolled out a new frequently asked questions resource containing a list of the most popular questions job seekers ask about diversity at companies, with responses taken from employee reviews on the platform.

Glassdoor CEO Christian Sutherland-Wong said in a statement, “Job seekers and employees today really care about equity and, for too long, they’ve lacked access to the information needed to make informed decisions about the companies that are, or are not, truly inclusive. We have a responsibility as a platform and employer to bridge the information gap that’s blocking the path to equity in and out of the workplace. By increasing transparency around diversity and inclusion within companies, we can help create more equitable companies and a more equitable society, too.”

Chief product officer Annie Pearl added, “There is immense power in the collective voice as a means for change. By inviting employees and job seekers to anonymously share their experiences on Glassdoor, we are helping millions navigate their careers and encouraging others to share their opinions without fear of retaliation. By providing this next level of transparency on Glassdoor, we’re also helping employers and employees alike stay accountable and committed to creating better, more equitable workplaces. Everyone deserves the opportunity to thrive in the workplace.”


david.cohen@adweek.com David Cohen is editor of Adweek's Social Pro Daily.
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