The OPA Excludes Porn …

… which means their numbers about what’s really going on in Internet video are, of course, skewed. Then, again, the Online Publishers’ Association is for companies that not only make content for online consumption but also offer others’ ads on it. And you don’t see many ads for, say, cars or hairspray or anything other than porn on porn.

OPA chief Pam Horan told a room full of MPA people today over lunch in a conference rental space in the midtown MPA building about the conclusions of a 2005 — which is plenty long ago in Internet time — study showing among other things that if you’re an advertiser you really should spend tons of money online, because it increases your reach to consumers and the effectiveness of your ads. And if the ad is video, some 44 percent of people who see the video will take an action based on it — that action could be emailing it to a friend (10%), or maybe throwing the computer out the window (2% said “other,” which could mean something along the lines of the above Vonage/Apple ad spoof), but it’s an action. Eight percent said they actually made a purchase.

Nothing else especially startling in the presentation, and we’d heard most of it before — ad quality matters, the Internet’s really popular as a medium at home and especially at work, and so on. But there was one piece of heartening news for the magazine industry types in the room. Horan believes, based on discussions with advertising execs, that the money for online advertising is coming out of broadcast rather than print budgets.