LA’s Tiziano Project Among 2011 Knight News Challenge Winners

The winners of the 2011 Knight News Challenge were announced today. Sixteen projects will split $4.7 million in grant money. Among them is the LA-based Tiziano Project, which will receive $200,000. Here’s the Knight Foundation’s description of the project.

Using visually dynamic, multimedia storytelling, the Tiziano Project provides communities with the equipment, training and web platform needed to report on stories that affect their residents’ lives. Tiziano will build an improved platform based on the award-winning project 360 Kurdistan. Using HTML5, the platform will display the work of professional and community journalists and will enable news organizations, community groups and individuals to easily manage digital content for mobile and tablet devices. The project will also build an interactive map to serve as a hub for projects developing similar sites in their communities and enable direct communication between these communities and their audiences.

Full list of winners, via Romenesko, after the jump:

2011 Knight News Challenge Winners

Project: iWitness
Winner: Adaptive Path, San Francisco, Calif.
Award: $360,000
Project Lead: Jesse James Garrett
Web: www.adaptivepath.com
Twitter: @AdaptivePath

To bridge the gap between traditional and citizen media, iWitness will create a web-based tool that aggregates user-generated content from social media during big news events. Whether a parade or protest, election or earthquake, iWitness will display photos, videos and messages in an easy-to-browse interface. Created by a premier web design firm, iWitness will make it easier to cross-reference first-person accounts with journalistic reporting, opening up new avenues for storytelling, fact-checking and connecting people to events in their communities.

Project: Overview
Winner: The Associated Press, New York, N.Y.
Award: $475,000
Project Lead: Jonathan Stray
Web: www.overview.ap.org
Twitter: @overviewproject

Overview is a tool to help journalists find stories in large amounts of data by cleaning, visualizing and interactively exploring large document and data sets. Whether from government transparency initiatives, leaks or freedom of information requests, journalists are drowning in more documents than they can ever hope to read. There are good tools for searching within large document sets for names and key words, but that doesn’t help find stories journalists are not looking for. Overview will display relationships among topics, people, places and dates to help journalists to answer the question, “What’s in there?” The goal is an interactive system where computers do the visualization, while a human guides the exploration – plus documentation and training to make this capability available to anyone who needs it.

Project: The Awesome Foundation: News Taskforce
Winner: The Awesome Foundation, Boston, Mass.
Award: $244,000
Project Lead: Tim Hwang
Web: www.awesomefoundation.org
Twitter: @higherawesome

To experiment with a new funding model for local journalism, The Awesome Foundation: News Taskforce will bring together 10 to 15 community leaders and media innovators in Detroit and two other cities to provide $1,000 microgrants to innovative journalism and civic media projects. By encouraging pilot projects, prototypes, events and social entrepreneurial ventures, the News Taskforce will encourage a wide swathe of the community to experiment with creative solutions to their information needs.

Project: PANDA
Winner: Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Ill.
Award: $150,000
Project Lead: Brian Boyer
Web: http://blog.apps.chicagotribune.com/
Twitter: @pandaproject

To help news organizations better use public information, the PANDA Project, in partnership with Investigative Reporters & Editors (IRE), the Chicago Tribune and The Spokane Spokesman-Review, will build a set of open-source, web-based tools that make it easier for journalists to use and analyze data. While national news organizations often have the staff and know-how to handle federal data, smaller news organizations are at a disadvantage. City and state data are messier, and newsroom staff often lack the tools to use it. PANDA will work with tools like Google Refine to find relationships among data sets and improve data sets for use by others. PANDA will be simple to deploy, allowing newsrooms without software developers on staff to integrate it into their work.