Did Coulter Plagiarize in Godless?

coulter_godless_plagiarism.jpgPlagiarism or sloppy cut-and-paste? That’s what blogger Rude Pundit is asking about two passages in Ann Coulter‘s white-hot book Godless, which has already had its share of criticism over its content.

Pundit’s evidence:

Coulter, Chapter 1 of Godless: The massive Dickey-Lincoln Dam, a $227 million hydroelectric project proposed on upper St. John River in Maine, was halted by the discovery of the Furbish lousewort, a plant previously believed to be extinct.

Portland Press Herald, from “Maine Stories of the Century”: The massive Dickey-Lincoln Dam, a $227 million hydroelectric project proposed on upper St. John River, is halted by the discovery of the Furbish lousewort, a plant believed to be extinct.

Coulter: A few years after oil drilling began in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, a saboteur set off an explosion blowing a hole in the pipeline and releasing an estimated 550,000 gallons of oil.

The History Channel: The only major oil spill on land occurred when an unknown saboteur blew a hole in the pipe near Fairbanks, and 550,000 gallons of oil spilled onto the ground.

Because Some Things Are More Profane Than Profanity — Ann Coulter’s Possible Plagiarism [Rude Pundit via Jossip]

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