Time-Sheet Blues

Agencies harass, cajole, bribe, beg and threaten in order to get people to turn their time sheets in on time. In his recent book The Peaceable Kingdom, Stan Richards even describes The Richards Group’s policy of reducing year-end bonuses for those who can’t get their act together.

T3 in Austin, Texas, has a novel way of dealing with the laggards. Harnessing the power of song, the agency recruited receptionist and singer Laura Guenat, who logs the daily time sheets, to write a ditty called “The Time Sheet Blues.” When too many sheets go missing, Guenat, an active performer in the local music scene, plays her song over the office intercom.

“Bring me your time sheets, I’ve got the time-sheet blues/Bring me your time sheets, babies, I’ve got the time-sheet blues/If you don’t bring me your time sheets, baby/I’ll sic old Charles on you.”

“Charles” is Charles Kiley, the agency’s chief financial officer.

“It is a problem because people get behind and everybody feels the pain,” says Jay Suhr, the shop’s executive creative director. But since the song began playing, he said, the number of missing time sheets has dropped dramatically.