Infographic: E-Scooter Company Bird by the Numbers

A look at how riders are using it in a crowded micromobility market

people using e-scooters
Bird's data shows most riders are locals who use it during the week to commute to work or school, but 30% also use Bird for fun.
Illustration: Trent Joaquin; Sources: Bird, Getty Images

PALM SPRINGS, Calif.—Bird, the 3-year-old electric scooter company, has so far landed in over 100 cities and 16 countries, but the micromobility market has been growing increasingly crowded.

Rebecca Hahn, Bird’s chief communications officer, said to expect the company to continue to expand globally in 2020 and “continued pushes to selling our own products.”

“You’ll see our brand continue to be authentic and collaborate with like-minded brands,” Hahn said. “The other thing is expanding into other verticals.”

For example, Bird is currently testing a moped pilot program in Santa Monica, Calif.

Hahn spoke at Brandweek about growing while diversifying. In Bird’s first year, the startup focused on product market fit and tried to own its evolving brand narrative.

“About six months in, a bunch of companies joined the space,” Hahn said. “We knew this would happen so we spent a lot of time developing our own hardware product.”

Rebecca Hahn at Brandweek
Sean T. Smith for Adweek

Bird’s data shows that most riders these days are locals who prefer to ride during the week, commuting to work or school. A survey by the company showed about 30% also use Bird for fun.

In Washington, D.C., specifically, Bird’s data shows an uptick in public transportation use on the part of Bird users and decreased use of taxis and ride-hailing services after work.

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