Advertisers say American attitudes toward Japan are softening, and even the xenophobic hit 'Rising Sun' is unlikely to alter that." /> Change of heart <b>By Betsy Sharke</b><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>Advertisers say American attitudes toward Japan are softening, and even the xenophobic hit 'Rising Sun' is unlikely to alter that.
Advertisers say American attitudes toward Japan are softening, and even the xenophobic hit 'Rising Sun' is unlikely to alter that." />
Advertisers say American attitudes toward Japan are softening, and even the xenophobic hit 'Rising Sun' is unlikely to alter that." />

Advertisers say American attitudes toward Japan are softening, and even the xenophobic hit ‘Rising Sun’ is unlikely to alter that." data-categories = "" data-popup = "" data-ads = "Yes" data-company = "[]" data-outstream = "yes" data-auth = "">

Change of heart By Betsy Sharke

Advertisers say American attitudes toward Japan are softening, and even the xenophobic hit 'Rising Sun' is unlikely to alter that.

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in the weeks before the opening of Rising Sun, some Japanese living in the U.S. feared the start of another round of Japan-bashing and lodged protests with the studio producing the film, Twentieth Century Fox. Their sentiments not only echoed the concerns of Japanese business leaders, who were wary the film might spark another blast of “Buy American” xenophobia, they also struck a chord within Hollywood, where Sony and Matsushita have become major players.
The fuss over the film, an adaptation of Michael Crichton’s novel about Corporate Japan’s attempts to take over U.S.

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