The news that four Western agencies had made the list of invitees to the $30-35-million IBM PC review was a benchmark for the West - a sign that, after years known as cre" /> In the <b>By Daniel S. Levine with Kathy Tyre</b><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>The news that four Western agencies had made the list of invitees to the $30-35-million IBM PC review was a benchmark for the West - a sign that, after years known as cre
The news that four Western agencies had made the list of invitees to the $30-35-million IBM PC review was a benchmark for the West - a sign that, after years known as cre" />
The news that four Western agencies had made the list of invitees to the $30-35-million IBM PC review was a benchmark for the West - a sign that, after years known as cre" />

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In the By Daniel S. Levine with Kathy Tyre

The news that four Western agencies had made the list of invitees to the $30-35-million IBM PC review was a benchmark for the West - a sign that, after years known as cre

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Not that California has failed to attract national accounts before. For some time now businesses from GM’s Saturn at Hal Riney & Partners/S.F. to Eveready at Chiat/Day in Venice, Calif., have traveled West to find ad agencies. But IBM is another breed of account, a member of that blue chip brigade of businesses for which West means Riverside Drive in New York City.

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