Morning Media Newsfeed: Oscar Selfie Sets Record | Charter Eyes TWC Subs | FCC Dumps Media Study

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Ellen’s Oscar Selfie Breaks Twitter Record (Variety)
Oscar host Ellen DeGeneres herded Meryl Streep, Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper, Angelina Jolie, Kevin Spacey and others into the most legendary selfie to ever hit the Internet. The sheer number of A-listers packed into the shot apparently caused Twitter to crash, leaving thousands of users locked out. ABC News During the telecast, DeGeneres vowed to set a new record with a photo of her posing with the gaggle of stars sitting in the audience. She had Cooper take the photo, which she captioned, “If only Bradley’s arm was longer. Best photo ever. #oscars” WSJ / Speakeasy The tweet then received more than 921,000 retweets in less than 40 minutes. It went on to get more than a million retweets and counting in less than an hour. The previously most retweeted tweet was one sent by the Twitter account @barackobama when the president won re-election. It simply said, “Four more years.” The Daily Beast The epic selfie needed more than 780,063 retweets to eclipse the iconic victory photo tweeted by Barack Obama in November 2012. It got more than that in just about 35 minutes. AllTwitter By 6 a.m. Monday, the tweet had been retweeted more than 2.3 million times and counting. Indeed, activity around the tweet and the Oscars was so heavy that Twitter experienced a 25-minute slowdown and a full shutdown for some users as the selfie quickly broke the record. Bloomberg Businessweek “We crashed and broke Twitter,” DeGeneres said later from the stage. “We made history.” The Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences, which presents the awards, took credit for the outage. “Sorry, our bad,” the Academy said on its Twitter account. Variety Unexpected demand for ABC’s live stream of the Oscars telecast over the Internet resulted in the video going down for users across the U.S., the network said Sunday. The live video through the Watch ABC app was “down nationwide due to a traffic overload/greater than expected,” a network rep said in an email. As of 10:45 p.m. ET, the feeds were back up, according to the rep, declining to provide additional information.

Comcast Said to Weigh Subscriber Spinoff With Time Warner Deal (Bloomberg)
Comcast Corp. is weighing options for how to divest about 3 million cable subscribers as part of a takeover of Time Warner Cable Inc. — including spinning them off in a new publicly traded company, people with knowledge of the matter said. Regulators may push for the spin-out because it would create a new competitor, one of the sources said. A new company formed in such a way would be the fourth-largest U.S. cable company by subscribers, trailing the merged Comcast-Time Warner Cable, Cox Communications Inc. and Charter Communications Inc. WSJ Charter Communications Inc. is seen as a possible bidder for those subscribers. Its biggest shareholder, Liberty Media Corp., isn’t taking “any option off the table” regarding its interest in Time Warner Cable, Liberty chief executive Greg Maffei told analysts on Friday. Reuters Maffei told a conference call that Charter could still go after Time Warner Cable if regulators reject the Comcast deal, although he expects it to win approval, though perhaps with “onerous conditions.” Deadline New York The likely loss of TWC doesn’t diminish Liberty’s interest in buying the minority stake in SiriusXM that it doesn’t already own. The recent offer was “not driven” by a desire to harness the satellite radio company’s cash flow to help support a cable acquisition.

FCC Dumps Controversial Media Study (Politico)
The Federal Communications Commission is pulling the plug on a controversial Critical Information Needs survey of TV newsroom activities that sparked a firestorm of criticism from Republicans. The study was to start this spring with a pilot test in Columbia, S.C., and it included questions about how TV stations determine what news stories to cover. It also sought insight into debates between journalists and management over news coverage. WSJ / Washington Wire The FCC’s survey was intended to determine whether barriers prevent entrepreneurs and small businesses from competing in the media marketplace. But Republicans quickly accused the FCC of overstepping its bounds and attempting to influence editorial decisions. National Journal The issue gained more widespread attention when Ajit Pai, a Republican FCC commissioner, wrote a Wall Street Journal op-ed blasting the study. He warned that the agency planned to send “researchers to grill reporters, editors and station owners about how they decide which stories to run.”