The Adweek 25: home to the best advertising voices on Twitter

Update for Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010


koopstakov

edwardboches

Have you noticed how many people are adding “innovation” to their job titles? It seems like innovation is the new digital. This week, we’re sticking with the theme. Joining the list is James Cooper, who has the unwieldy title of chief creative innovation officer at JWT New York. Cooper won us over with a personal appeal about his worthiness, impeccable Ping-Pong ability and willingness to call BS on the au courant idea that creatives and strategists are the same. That means we have to say goodbye to another chief innovator, Edward Boches. He’s a charter member of the Adweek 25, but we need to make room for new voices.

Boches-grateful

 

THE CURRENT LIST:


annaobrien

bastholm

benkunz

bethcomstock

bigspaceship

chloalo

cotton

darrellwhitelaw

dberkowitz

dddiana

griner

ischafer

jtwinsor

koopstakov

LCrampsie

LenKendall

leighhouse

luckthelady

MadeByMany

malbonster

marciikeler

McCann_NY

mtlb

RGA

Schwartzie14

 

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Update for Monday, Dec. 6, 2010


jeffbadby

LCrampsie

We begin this week with a refresher on the complex formula used to devise this list. Edward Boches, chief innovation officer at Mullen and a charter member of the Adweek 25, has crunched some data in an effort to figure out who on the list is really influential. Something similar was once done with Klout scores. In short, we don’t have a formula. You could argue this is lazy, but we think it’s the best approach for several reasons:
  1) “Influencer” measures aren’t very scientific. They typically value people with lots of reach who spend all day tweeting. See here. We’d rather have no formula than a dubious one.
  2) The most “influential” industry tweeters often talk about the same stuff. There seems to be a vast digital strategy industrial complex that’s cornered Twitter. Our list still overindexes with this crowd more than we’d like. It’s almost like a cool-kids group that’s always RTing each other and lauding its members.
  3) We have a semi-firm No Social-Media Gurus Policy. This crowd tends to do quite well in scientific measures.
  4) It’s proudly random. Part of the magic of Groupon is how strange it can be. You get leg waxing one day, go-kart rides the next. We want that in here. We want people from traditional advertising and digital. We want people in PR, media and other disciplines.
  5) We have a point of view. We don’t like inanity like Foursquare airport checkins, RTing yourself, those satanic Paper.li things and other bad behavior. That’s purely subjective. This makes it more fun.
  With that said, it’s time for this week’s hellos and goodbyes. It would be bad form to off Edward for his post, so he’s safe. Instead, we’re pulling the plug on our Jeff Goodby experiment. Judging from his recent tweets, his mind is clearly focused on Chevy. It doesn’t make for scintillating material. Taking his place is Lauren Crampsie, the CMO at Ogilvy, who wins extra points as an Eagles fan.

Update for Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2010


MikeDuda

shivsingh

leighhouse

mtlb

We took a week off due to the holiday, but we’re back to do some pruning to the Adweek 25. Ex-adman and now “brand capitalist” Mike Duda is first in our crosshairs. In his place, we’re welcoming Leigh Householder, proprietress of Advergirl.com and digital strategist at GSW Worldwide. Householder is a sharer of fun facts in healthcare marketing like, “A man’s sperm can still impregnate a woman after he’s been dead and buried for 3 days.” Now that’s stuff we don’t know. There’s one more switch. Out goes Shiv Singh, head of digital for PepsiCo Beverages, and in comes Bill Green, the force behind the Make the Logo Bigger blog, co-host of the AdVerve podcast and all-around advertising superpundit.