A proposal to place advertising in the heavens is considered blasphemy by many. But there are some good reasons to see if the idea can fly." /> The sky is filling <b>By Michael Schrag</b><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>A proposal to place advertising in the heavens is considered blasphemy by many. But there are some good reasons to see if the idea can fly.
A proposal to place advertising in the heavens is considered blasphemy by many. But there are some good reasons to see if the idea can fly." />
A proposal to place advertising in the heavens is considered blasphemy by many. But there are some good reasons to see if the idea can fly." />

A proposal to place advertising in the heavens is considered blasphemy by many. But there are some good reasons to see if the idea can fly." data-categories = "" data-popup = "" data-ads = "Yes" data-company = "[]" data-outstream = "yes" data-auth = "">

The sky is filling By Michael Schrag

A proposal to place advertising in the heavens is considered blasphemy by many. But there are some good reasons to see if the idea can fly.

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Pity the orbital entrepreneurs at Space Marketing Inc. What they hoped would be a meteoric media rise has instead begun to look more and more like a commercial crater.
First, this celestial start-up gets–yes!–Columbia Pictures to pay $500,000 to become the first advertiser in space with a deal to turn the main fuselage of NASA’s 58-foot Conestoga rocket boosters into a billboard for Last Action Hero.

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