A retrospective of women's images in advertising shows how the creative revolution left half of us behind barricades (or bustiers)." /> ADWEEK CRITIQUE: YOU'VE COME A SHORT WAY, BABY <b>By BARBARA LIPPER</b><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>A retrospective of women's images in advertising shows how the creative revolution left half of us behind barricades (or bustiers).
A retrospective of women's images in advertising shows how the creative revolution left half of us behind barricades (or bustiers)." />
A retrospective of women's images in advertising shows how the creative revolution left half of us behind barricades (or bustiers)." />

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ADWEEK CRITIQUE: YOU'VE COME A SHORT WAY, BABY By BARBARA LIPPER

A retrospective of women's images in advertising shows how the creative revolution left half of us behind barricades (or bustiers).

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There’s no doubt women’s images in advertising have become a lot more enlightened lately. In the last few weeks alone, I’ve reviewed great spots for Nike and AmEx. Each preaches a celebratory idea of power and self-acceptance. But in advertising, it always seems to be one step forward, one step toward meaningless cliche.
For example, we know the ‘e’ word is headed for trouble when empowerment has come to Elsie the Cow.

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