Muh-tay-zik | Hof-fer

Jay Benjamin Reveals His 3 Favorite Ads, and His Plans for Muh-tay-zik Hof-fer’s NYC Office

The new executive creative creator at Muh-tay-zik Hof-fer's New York office, who recently left the top creative post at Saatchi & Saatchi New York, named his three favorite ads of all time when Adweek caught up with him in Las Vegas at LIA judging.

VCCP Acquires Muh-Tay-Zik Hof-fer to Form Creative Partnership

Over the years, agency holding companies have approached San Francisco-based agency Muh-Tay-Zik Hof-fer about partnerships, but its executives dismissed them every time. "We never gave it much thought. It wasn't something we needed or were looking for," said John Matejczyk, the agency's executive creative director.

Method Leaf-Blows a Birthday Cake and Makes Other Unholy Messes in These Fun Ads

Hand, dish and laundry liquids get surprisingly sexy in a new campaign from green cleaning brand Method. Call it haute soap.  The brand's new "Fear No Mess" campaign, which might be less pithily articulated as "Make as Big a Mess as You Possibly Can," features immaculately dressed heroes finding inventive ways to trash beautifully designed rooms in a series of TV ads. 

Audi Set Up Free Wi-Fi at the New York Auto Show, and Look What the Networks Are Called

Audi hits the New York Auto Show this week with the message that its A4 has surpassed the BMW 328i in many areas, like horsepower, acceleration and technologies including lane assist and CarPlay. And it's taking some shots at BMW with a sly technology hack as well. Audi has set up a bunch of free Wi-Fi networks—Wi-Fi is typically hard to find at auto shows, and usually password-protected—and given them names that double as ads for the A4 (and in fact, as attack ads on the 328i as well).

Why a Digitally Savvy Finance Brand Decided to Go ‘Old School’ With a Super Bowl Ad

Despite some initial skepticism about whether it was the right move, financial services company Social Finance, or SoFi, is now all in on the Super Bowl.

These Cinematic AAA Spots Focus on Brand’s Insurance Plans Instead of Roadside Service

In a new campaign for AAA, San Francisco agency Muh-tay-zik | Hof-fer tries to "re-imagine" the venerable American brand by focusing on how its insurance offerings—not just its roadside assistance—improve the quality of everyday life. "We love the idea of taking a big, trusted American brand and breathing new life into it," says John Matejczyk, the agency's executive creative director. "AAA already had enormous trust. But we saw an opportunity to increase their relevance." The multimedia push includes digital, social, radio and out-of-home elements, and a pair of low-key, minute-long TV spots. Each selects a visual focus around which to spin its story.

Why Maker Studios Chose This Agency for Its Ad-Buying Service

Maker Studios has already partnered with the big guns for its Maker Select ad-buying service. Now the Disney-owned multichannel network has signed on its first small-scale agency, which leans heavily on social and digital.

Stan Lee Gets a Starring Role in Audi’s Short Film About His Famous Cameos

Stan Lee gets more than a bit part, for a change, in this great Audi tie-in to The Avengers, as he plays the part of the world's greatest cameo actor. It's a piece of pitch-perfect fan service tailor made for Marvel junkies who delight in wondering which cameo role Lee will play in every Marvel film. After all, as the Audi spot says, "When it comes to small roles, Stan Lee is the biggest."

This San Francisco Agency Celebrates Offbeat Projects for an Eclectic Client List

Specs Who John Matejczyk (l.), ecd, and Matt Hofherr, president, director of strategy What Advertising and production company Where San Francisco offices

Streaming Yule Log on Netflix Has Its Own Hilarious Trailer and Director’s Commentary

The original Yule Log television broadcast dates back to 1966, when WPIX-TV aired footage of a cozy fireplace to cheer up New Yorkers who lived in apartments without one. But Netflix really gives it a modern spin this year, humorously advertising its streaming Yule Log channel with a faux-epic trailer and two-minute behind-the-scenes director's commentary video. It's all perfectly stupid and hilarious, particularly the longer video, in which the auteur picks out the right logs on a farm and marvels at particularly serendipitous "ashing" in footage of the burning wood. Great holiday cheer by ad agency Muh-Tay-Zik | Hof-fer.