Bob Dylan

Will This Megaconcert With the Stones, Dylan and The Who Really Pass Up Sponsors?


Ad of the Day: IBM’s Watson Talks Love and Loss With Bob Dylan in Advertising’s Oddest Pairing

Most of us know IBM's Watson as a threat to humanity's dominance of Jeopardy and the AI successor to a machine that similarly dethroned chessmaster Garry Kasparov.

Bob Dylan Went Electric. And You Should Too, With a Plug-In Hybrid, Says Audi

A new hybrid-electric Audi is just like that time Bob Dylan shocked audiences by playing an electric guitar at the Newport Folk Festival, says Audi.

Why Licensed Music Matters to Brands Like Hyundai and Chobani

Even though classic rockers like Led Zeppelin and Bob Dylan have finally warmed to licensing their songs to brands, marketing chiefs remain picky about when and how to use music in ads.

Why Led Zeppelin, Billy Joel and Dylan Now Readily Sell Their Songs to Brands

When Led Zeppelin licensed “Rock and Roll” to Cadillac for its “Break Through” spot in 2002, it was a huge coup for the carmaker, as the band had neve

Stock Media Seller Pond5 Transitions to Online Video Creators

Stock media site Pond5 has been known for providing royalty-free content for mainstream TV and film projects like AMC's The Walking Dead and movies such as Iron Man, Thor and Dallas Buyers Club.

Chipotle, Honda Win Multiple Gold Lions in Branded Content, But No One Takes Grand Prix

CANNES, France—In one of the marketing industry's hottest categories, branded content and entertainment, three U.S. campaigns won gold Lions at Cannes here tonight, but the top honor went noticeably unawarded.

How Selling Out Can Help or Hurt Your Band

Musicians have always struggled with whether licensing their music or becoming a spokesperson for a brand will affect the relationship they have with their fans. Some artists have been able to reap the benefits of ad partnerships and use it to grow a dedicated audience. Others have spread themselves to the point of becoming a musical plague. We present case-and-point studies of 12 musicians or bands who have become household names—and whether their choices to work with advertisers has affected their place in music history.  —MUSICIANS WHO SOLD OUT AND WON Snoop Dogg / Snoop Lion No one has been able to retain cred and sell his talents to almost every company like the D-O-double G. Snoop has promoted everything from Star Wars products for Adidas to ultra-caffeinated Pepsi Max. He even got away with the horribly punny Pocket Like It’s Hot and You Got What I Eat, both for Hot Pockets. He can do no wrong. Madonna Don’t forget that the pop queen sought sponsorship from Pepsi for her classic single “Like a Prayer.” That relationship burned to the ground. (No pun intended.) Despite that fiasco, she’s still in advertisers’ good graces and has worked with BMW and Gap to name a couple. Impressively, she’s still retained her rebel persona. Just a few years back, ABC reportedly asked her to tone down the sexual content of a perfume commercial. Not bad for being a Material Girl in her 50s. U2 The Irish rockers sponsored a red iPod and teamed up with Bank of America both to unveil their track “Invisible” while supporting a worthy cause, fighting HIV/AIDS with the (RED) campaign. But, they haven’t lost their ability to sell out stadiums. Dr. Dre There probably hasn’t been an album as anticipated as Detox, which has reportedly been in the works since 2001. But no one has accused Dre of not keeping busy. In addition to producing acts like Eminem, Kendrick Lamar, and 50 Cent, recently his most well-known contribution to the music world has been touting Beats by Dre. Instead of accusing Dre of working on electronics instead of getting to the studio, fans are rocking the multi-colored headphones as a fashion accessory. Bob Dylan When the iconic rock legend decided to do a Super Bowl ad for Chrysler, many listeners accused him of selling out. However, they seem to have forgotten that Dylan has appeared in past spots for Pepsi, Apple and Victoria’s Secret, while licensing his music to many more companies. His long career has survived these campaigns, and it’s highly unlikely that Dylan fans will stop listening anytime soon. Metallica The band complains about how it isn't making enough money because people are listening to its music for free. They've licensed their music to Guitar Hero, which is basically musical instruments for people who have very little musical talent. Lars collects fine art. Fans still worship them as metal, counter culture gods.

Coke’s America Is Beautiful Continues to Resonate

Last week, a new conventional wisdom seemed to have emerged: it's no longer wise to hold Super Bowl ads until the actual game, if you want to win the YouTube/social media race.

Many Brands Who Held Back Super Bowl Ads Struggle on YouTube

In recent years, the trend among Super Bowl advertisers has been to tease their spots on the Web days or even weeks before the game—even advertising their impending ads. That strategy has shocked purists, who argue that spending all that cash on a Super Bowl spot warrants protecting the art of surprise. But according to data from the analytics firm Tubular Labs, as well as a compelling new dashboard from the Web video marketing firm Touchstorm, brands that waited to unveil their Super Bowl ads may be paying a price—that is, if you believe YouTube views are a good arbiter of a successful Super Bowl spot.