Glenn Beck Selling New Line of Jeans to Manly American Rocket Builders | Adweek Glenn Beck Selling New Line of Jeans to Manly American Rocket Builders | Adweek
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Glenn Beck Selling New Line of Jeans to Manly American Rocket Builders Take that, Levi's

Real men build rocket ships with their bare hands. Real men wear Glenn Beck jeans. They're American jeans, partly because they were made in America but mostly because Glenn Beck says so. They're called 1791, like Beck's other fashion items, probably because that was one of the few years when real men like the Founding Fathers actually made anything in this country, or something. "These were the first American blue jeans," says the voiceover in the ad below, even though they were just announced on Monday, and we're pretty sure other jeans have been made in America before. These are "the jeans that built America," the voice adds, even though America has been around for a while, and jeans can't build anything, because they don't have thumbs. Beck was inspired to make his own jeans after Levi's released an ill-timed ad last year featuring riot imagery, prompting Beck to boycott the brand after realizing its jeans were made not in America and marketed to sissy Communist revolutionaries in not in America. Now, you can buy Beck's jeans for only $129.99 a pair, because that's a much more patriotically reasonable price than the $400 price tag Beck made up for a pair of Levi's. That's a relief for real men who want to take that extra $270 and buy scrap metal for their DIY rocket ships. We'd say Alex Bogusky's made-in-America-centric agency Made Movement should pitch Beck's business, but we're pretty sure nothing could top this ad's ability to turn a patriotic political statement into a profit. Via Romenesko.

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