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Gap Made a Bunch of Short Art Films, and They're Weird but Very Good A case for artists to get into advertising

If there ever were a case for injecting fine-art theory into advertising, and vice versa, it's these latest short spots from Gap. The 10 mini-spots, from Wieden + Kennedy in New York, promoting the clothing retailer's holiday gift guide, are so odd—but could totally pass as an MFA thesis or be seen at a gallery in Chelsea.

Gap—which last week rolled out four proper holiday commercials directed by Sofia Coppola, also from W+K—ditches human models here and clothes ordinary objects in its newest threads, aided by some perfectly matched sound effects and tracks. They're delightful and ridiculous and playful, and among my favorite ads this year. 

If Marcel Duchamp were still alive to make ads, this is what he'd make. 

Oh, and Gap and W+K also collaborated on a digital game where you use your webcam to "play" the stripes on your Gap striped sweater.

 
Sweater Dance: This is literally the best ad for a sweater ever. 

 
Lightning Scarves: Thunder is God bowling, and lightning is scarves.

 
Jacket Drones: Giving new meaning to the bomber jacket. 

 
Sweater Speaker: All about that bass.

 
Racing Shoes: Almost as awesome as Magic Carpet Cat.

 
Hula-Hoop PJs: The weird crowning jewel of Gap's odd thesis project.

 
Windshield Gloves: Kind of wish these were a real thing. 

 
Treadmill March: What if OK Go made a Gap ad?

 
Hi-5 Machine: No seriously, art collectors would buy the crap out of this. 

 
Flower Shower: American Beauty, but with no people in it. 

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AdFreak is a daily blog of the best and worst of creativity in advertising, media, marketing and design. Follow us as we celebrate (and skewer) the latest, greatest, quirkiest and freakiest commercials, promos, trailers, posters, billboards, logos and package designs around. Edited by Adweek's Tim Nudd.

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