Fakes

This Pitch-Perfect Parody of an Entire New Yorker Issue Features Wonderful Fake Ads

If you're the kind of person who has time to read The New Yorker cover to cover, then you'll appreciate this delightfully meta, magazine-length satire.  The Neu Jorker, a passion project from co-editors James Folta and Andrew Lipstein, not only lampoons the magazine's poetry, reviews and sections like Goings On About Town and Shouts & Murmurs, but also the kind of ads you find in a publication like The New Yorker. 

Galactic Empire Turns Frankfurt Airport Into a Fully Armed, Operational Battle Station

The Empire might not be running the galaxy anymore, but it seems to be doing a stellar job running an airport in Germany. 

Q&A: How a Reality TV Show Pranked America With Fake Celebrity Divorce Ads

We've been had. It turns out that one man's heroic billboard crusade to prevent celebrity divorce was actually a hoax by WEtv to advertise its new show Marriage Boot Camp: Reality Stars. We caught up with WEtv President Marc Juris (pictured below) to find out how he hit the zeitgeist and tricked media outlets across the nation: AdFreak: Is there a real J. Robert Butler? Mark Juris: You're speaking to him. No, he's a fictional character we invented, played by a real actor. Whom you made up a whole backstory for about his daughter's divorce … Because the most important thing you have to remember is that the audience is incredibly smart. We created a whole character, a persona and a motivation. Thought about why he would do this, what he expected would be the response. I think the inclination is to have him say some outrageous stuff, and we pulled all that back and had him be more realistic. How did you hatch the hoax? We went through a couple of ideas. We thought, "Could we make these billboards poking fun at celebrity couples who had divorced?" But it just felt too much like an overt ad campaign. And that’s the problem with overt campaigns; people just drive by them and just keep going. So we thought, "How can we really do this?" What if we made an organization that seemed ridiculous but could be real and serious?

Easton’s Slugger Can Hit Damn Near Anything

Earlier this month, Easton sports gear scored a viral hit with its "Ultimate Batting Practice" video, which was viewed more than 2 million times on YouTube. Well, if you liked that bit of obvious fakery, you might just love the "Skeet Ball" sequel below.

Gold Lions not quite as scarce as they used to be

By Tim Nudd Augmented reality is getting more popular in advertising these days, whether you're talking about GE Smart Grid technology or Optimus Prime. Proximity BBDO and Pub magazine in […]