Del Campo Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi

Does Chewing Gum Make You Look Like a Fool? Brand Tests Identical Twins to Find Out

Here's an unusual two-for-one deal from Del Campo Saatchi & Saatchi for Beldent gum. The Mondelez brand, known as Trident in the U.S., staged "Almost Identical," a social experiment/marketing installation at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Buenos Aires, ostensibly to disprove the myth that gum chewing gives a bad impression.

VH1’s ‘I Will Survive’ Anti-Bullying Ad Is Great Fun, but Does It Send a Good Message?

Gloria Gaynor's disco classic "I Will Survive" gets remade as an anti-bullying anthem in this VH1 spot by Del Campo Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi in Argentina, showing tormented boys and girls singing out their plans for sweet revenge in adulthood.Expertly staged by music-video veteran Agustin Alberdi and boasting a great cast, the ad feels kind of like a musical number from Glee in its heyday. It opens with a kid enduring the indignity of a dual swirly/pantsing: "First I was afraid, I was petrified/They flushed my head several times, exposing my behind." Other tortured middle-schoolers soon pick up the thread. One looks ahead to the day when, "Oh my power, I will abuse/I'll be the CEO, you'll be the one who shines my shoes." Another promises, "I'm gonna call you night and day/And on weekends I'll send texts/Ask you for all kinds of things, making sure you never rest."On one level, the video is a marvel of wish fulfillment that anyone who's ever been picked on or put down during lunch period or study hall can instantly relate to. Believing you can turn the tables feels great, and the spot hits all the right notes in that regard. Still, the tone and message ultimately fall flat. The revenge motif, though lighthearted, seems to perpetuate the cycle of bullying, with today's victims becoming tomorrow's oppressors. Yes, it's handled with a deft touch and good humor—and the jerks in the boy's bathroom using that kid's head as a toilet scrubber certainly have it coming.Even so, breaking the cycle and discouraging the behavior should be the goal, shouldn't it? There's really none of that here. (Contrast VH1's approach with Everynone's short film on bullying from a few years back, which really captured the complexity of the issue.)Also, ultimately, these bullies are free to go about their brutish business. Vague threats of corporate comeuppance 20 years hence seem pretty lame when victims ripe for pantsing are available in the here and now. Meanwhile, the terrorized kids tunefully suffer and bide their time, fated to wait decades for "revenge" which, let's face it, may never come.Bullies grow up to be bosses sometimes, and nerds aren't always management material, no matter how earnestly kids in PSAs sing to the contrary.Credits below.

Ad of the Day: BGH

It is summer in Argentina, and there is a man staring out his window at you.

The Spot: The Bottle Boy

IDEA: What's the point of a wide-mouth bottle? It makes beer easier to drink. But that's … kind of boring. Couldn't someone think of a more exciting purpose for it, or at least make one up? Enter Andes, the Argentine lager.

Beer Brand Concocts Crazy Hiding Places for That Last Bottle

¿Dónde está la cerveza? Del Campo Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi's past work for Andes beer was special because it broke through the fourth wall in big ways, extending its over-the-top wacky ideas—matter transporters and robo-pals—into Argentina's bar scene.

Nothing Sells Air Conditioners Like Flabby Dads in Their Underpants

Conventional wisdom says a montage of fat dads in their underpants is a bad way to sell air conditioners. But Argentine ad agency Del Campo Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi has proven it's fantastic at selling the need for them.

Ad of the Day: Norte Beer

Ever log into Facebook only to see that your friends have tagged you in photos that couldn't have been taken at a worse time? In Argentina, a beer brand wants to help.

Sony Gives Wider View of Goofy Einstein Photo

Why did Einstein stick out his tongue in that iconic photograph? Sony Cybershot takes you behind the scenes, offering a never-before-seen (and fictional) panoramic version of the shot. Check it out below, along with a related Marilyn Monroe spot after the jump. Both ads, created by Argentina's Del Campo Nazca Saatchi & Saatchi, are reminiscent of Samsung's recent ads about viewing art masterpieces in 3-D, which unfortunately have been removed from YouTube. Hat tip to The Presurfer. Blog pagesbrightcove.createExperiences();