REPORT: Retailers’ Paid Facebook Impressions Up, Organic Impressions Down in 4Q

By David Cohen Comment

With Facebook set to reveal its fourth-quarter and full-year-2014 financial results Wednesday evening, Adobe, one of the social network’s Strategic Preferred Marketing Developers, offered its take on Facebook advertising in its latest research.

Adobe said in a blog post that it analyzed more than 400 billion Facebook post impressions during 2013 and 2014, and its findings included:

  • Paid impressions on Facebook from retailers were up 53 percent in the fourth quarter of 2014 compared with the third quarter, and up 13 percent year over year.
  • Organic impressions on Facebook fell 32 percent year-over-year.
  • Video posts performed the best in terms of organic impressions, while text-only posts were casualties of the many changes to Facebook’s News Feed algorithm, dropping 60 percent compared with the fourth quarter of 2013.
  • Retailers were posting more on Facebook during the fourth quarter of 2014, up 31 percent quarter-over-quarter and 64 percent year-over-year.
  • Interaction rates (comments, likes, shares and other interactions) for posts form retail brands were up 14 percent in the fourth quarter of 2014 compared with the year-ago period.
  • TGIF: The day of the week with the highest share of Facebook posts, impressions and interaction rates was Friday.

Adobe4Q2014FBPostInteractionIndustry Adobe4Q2014FBPostInteractionType Adobe4Q2014FBShareInteractionByDay

Adobe Digital Index principal analyst Tamara Gaffney said in the blog post:

What’s happening with marketers is that there are constant changes going on with Facebook’s algorithm that favor certain types of posts. A colleague recently pointed out to me that it used to take marketers six to eight months to respond to a Facebook algorithm change. Now marketers adjust their strategies much quicker to ensure they maintain their reach and capitalize on whatever the algorithm adjustment that is going to favor them in the Facebook News Feed.

Readers: Did any of Adobe’s findings surprise you?

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