'Businessweek' Relaunches Website | Adweek 'Businessweek' Relaunches Website | Adweek
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'Businessweek' Unwraps New Website

Venue will provide more links to Bloomberg.com
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Two years ago, Bloomberg LP bought Businessweek and pumped resources into the editorial product, making it a more visual and snappy read. Now, it’s relaunching Businessweek.com in hopes of doing the same for the magazine’s website.

With the relaunch, effective today, the formerly generic-looking Businessweek.com reflects the look of the magazine, which creative director Richard Turley has given a bold new redesign. Photos dominate the home page, and there are bright color-coded section tabs, just like those in the magazine. In terms of the content, there will be more analysis and offbeat stories, like a recent article on an odd new combination tablet-smartphone with the jaunty lede, “Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s a Padfone.”

Businessweek wants to be the brand for the new breed of business leader, who is much more global-minded, more curious abut the world,” explained Paul Bascobert, president of Businessweek. “This is the Bloomberg Businesweek brand online. The brand essence is about new angles on stories.”

The revamp of Businessweek.com also gave its execs a chance to differentiate it from Bloomberg.com. Bloomberg bought Businessweek to raise the profile of the company, which is better known for its subscription-based financial services, and it’s not missing the opportunity with Businessweek.com, which will now feature more links to flagship site Bloomberg.com.

“We have two pretty good websites that serve different functions,” said Josh Tyrangiel, the editor of Businessweek and Businessweek.com. “Bloomberg.com has hundreds and hundreds of stories a day covering [news] in real time. [Businessweek.com] will have fewer stories. But the brand is a bit more colloquial and analytical. They can, and will be, more distinct and point back and forth.”

Publications often relaunch their Web and print properties simultaneously, but executives at Businessweek said they wanted to wait to take on the site until they got the staff and magazine right. As Tyrangiel put it: “You can’t go into running a website half-assed.”

A few weeks ago, Tyrangiel pulled his staff together and called for them to step up their daily Web production. “We’ve completely realigned the culture of Businessweek so it’s a digital news organization,” he said. “People have turned on the juice.”