Has YouTube Signed Television’s Death Warrant? [Infographic]

As more and more people start getting their entertainment fix on the web, what’s to become of our antiquated TV sets? A new infographic from Freemake.com asserts that YouTube has already killed TV. Though this may be a bit of an overstatement, the infographic does contain some fun statistics and does bring up some interesting questions. Check it out after the jump.

As online video becomes more popular it’s becoming increasingly difficult to avoid the question of what effect this growth is having on good old-fashioned television.  As more and more people start getting their entertainment fix on the web, what’s to become of our antiquated TV sets?  A new infographic from Freemake.com asserts that YouTube has already killed TV.  Though this may be a bit of an overstatement, the infographic does contain some fun statistics and does bring up some interesting questions.  Read on to find out more.

Freemake reports that, “With CBS and MGM streaming content to YouTube, and the launch in Spring 2008 of Hulu (Fox, NBC, ABC), all major TV networks have had to join forces with or create imitations of YouTube.  TVs may still be in our homes but they’re a fraction of their former selves.  The strangle hold they once had on the moving image and our minds has been broken never to return…”

They back this statement up with statistics showing that YouTube searches have increased dramatically over the last six years while the growth of TV-related searches has been relatively slow, YouTube is serving double the videos of that of the prime-time television audience, YouTube ad revenue has grown while TV ad revenue has slowed, and more.

Of course, I think it’s necessary to point out that YouTube has only been around since 2005 while television has been around for over half a century.  Since people are just learning about YouTube it makes sense that searches for YouTube would grow more dramatically than TV searches, as people have been conducting TV-related searches since the beginning of the Internet.  YouTube also serves up a much wider range and quality of content than traditional TV.  Additionally, I find it much more likely that services like Netflix and Hulu would lead to the death of TV than YouTube, and I think that even that is a long way off, though YouTube is taking major steps forward on the original content front.

That being said, online video has definitely led to some major changes in the television industry, and is sure to lead to even more in the near future.  Check out the infographic below for some interesting stats on how television has been affected by online video thus far and feel free to share your thoughts with us in the comments below.  Do you think online video, and more specifically YouTube, have or will lead to the ultimate downfall of TV?

Megan O’Neill is the resident web video enthusiast here at Social Times.  Megan covers everything from the latest viral videos to online video news and tips, and has a passion for bizarre, original and revolutionary content and ideas.