User Files $1.00 Lawsuit Against Facebook

"It's not just the support issue, either," Fagin goes on to say. "On one hand, they tell you not to 'friend' anyone you don't already know. On the other, the site constantly bombards you with names of people that Facebook themselves suggests you should 'friend', as you already have multiple friends in common."

The first time David Fagin saw he was being blocked from sending friend requests on Facebook, as well as being labeled a spammer, he didn’t think much of it. Then, when it happened again, and he was informed that he was in danger of having his account deleted, he tried to resolve it by reaching out to Facebook’s support department – only to discover they don’t have one.

“It’s not just the support issue, either,” Fagin goes on to say. “On one hand, they tell you not to ‘friend’ anyone you don’t already know. On the other, the site constantly bombards you with names of people that Facebook themselves suggests you should ‘friend’, as you already have multiple friends in common.”

Upon discovering Facebook did not provide legitimate help or support of any kind to provide resolution in the matter, Fagin, who writes a column for AOL News, decided to blog about it. He states, “There aren’t too many words that exist in Webster’s New Millennium Dictionary that conjure up more offensive and sleazy images than that of a ‘spammer.’”

The story received thousands of hits, made its way to AOL’s home page, and caught the attention of litigation attorney, Gillian Overland, Esq. “I read David’s article and completely agreed. The fact that you’re dealing with a company as large and as powerful as Facebook and their only means of public intercourse is a run-of-the-mill FAQ page? This needs to be fixed.”

But how do you fix a problem when there’s no one there to fix it?

“Unfortunately, it took a murder to get regulators to force Craigslist to change their policies. In this case, it seems the only way to get Mark Zuckerberg and company to respond to user complaints is with lawsuits,” Fagin says. “Obviously suing the world’s biggest company for a dollar won’t hurt their pocketbook, but it might get the public debate going. And that’s the main objective here.”