Twitter Is Fielding Fewer Reports on Accounts Promoting Terrorism

75 percent of these accounts were suspended before posting their first tweet

Curses ... foiled again!
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Twitter said it removed 299,649 accounts for promoting terrorism during the first six months of 2017, bringing its total to 935,897 from Aug. 1, 2015, through this past June 30.

Promotion of terrorism accounted for slightly more than 2 percent of accounts reported to Twitter, as the social network cited an 80 percent plunge in the reporting of such accounts by governments when compared with the second half of 2016, with government requests accounting for less than 1 percent of account suspensions.

Twitter Public Policy said in a blog post detailing its most recent Transparency Report, for the first half of 2017, “95 percent of these account suspensions were the result of our internal efforts to combat this content with proprietary tools, up from 74 percent in our last Transparency Report. Between accounts surfaced by both our internal tools and government reports, Twitter removed 299,649 accounts during this reporting period, a 20 percent drop from the previous reporting period. Notably, 75 percent of these accounts were suspended before posting their first tweet.”

Government terms of service reports covering the abusive behavior section of Twitter’s rules made up 98 percent of the total, and Twitter said it took action in response to 13 percent of those requests, with the majority not resulting in the removal of content.

The social network received 6 percent more global government requests for account information in the first half of 2017 than in the last six months of last year, affecting 3 percent fewer accounts.

Twitter also fielded approximately 10 percent more global legal requests to remove content from January through June 2017 than in the second half of 2016, involving about 12 percent more accounts.

More detailed information is available in Twitter’s Transparency Report, including data on abusive behavior and violations of copyrights and trademarks, as well as U.S.-specific figures.