Is Facebook Dead to Brands? Not So Fast …

Despite grumblings about declining organic reach by brands on Facebook, they have not given up on the social network, actually posting more in 2015, according to the latest social benchmark study from Quintly.

Despite grumblings about declining organic reach by brands on Facebook, they have not given up on the social network, actually posting more in 2015, according to the latest social benchmark study from social analytics provider Quintly.

Quintly analyzed more than 180,000 brand profiles on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter throughout 2015, and its findings included:

  • Daily post frequency rose by 36 percent on Facebook and by 14 percent on Instagram, while slipping by 2 percent on Twitter.
  • Instagram posted the highest follower growth among the three social networks in 2015, but it peaked in February and began trending downward, while Facebook and Twitter were more stable.
  • Instagram topped Facebook and Twitter in terms of engagement rate, and brand with the smallest followings (1,000 or fewer) on all three social networks boasted the strongest engagement rates.

Quintly2015BrandPostsStudy

Quintly said in a blog post revealing its findings:

Due to the described fact that Instagram is still on the rise in terms of the number of users and daily posts, it makes sense that businesses ramp up their activities there. On Facebook, the strong increase is a sign that Facebook is far from being “dead.” It shows that companies still rely heavily on this network. Having said that, companies in 2015 also increased their activities in this network.

Regarding social media marketing, marketers prefer to rely more on Facebook probably due to its larger user base or better targeting for businesses. Fair enough–massive audience and lower marketing cost have expanded the possibilities of this social network for businesses. But the time is now to keep an eye on the potential of other relevant social networking sites while continuing to be active in the present ones with a detailed strategy.

Readers: What did you think of Quintly’s findings?

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