Outsource Your Day-To-Day Errands On Your iPhone with AirRun

When you absolutely, positively need to get something done — by someone else — you can turn to AirRun. Designed to simplify day-to-day tasks by, AirRun combines location-based services/geolocation, peer-to-peer business, job outsourcing and game mechanics all in a free app.AirRun connects the lazy with the industrious. Its marketing presentation is fun and fluffless — even if you don’t download the app, you can’t help but want these guys to succeed.

When you absolutely, positively need to get something done — by someone else — you can turn to AirRun. Designed to simplify day-to-day tasks, AirRun combines location-based services/geolocation, peer-to-peer business, job outsourcing and game mechanics all in a free app.

AirRun connects the lazy with the industrious. Its marketing presentation is fun and fluffless — even if you don’t download the app, you can’t help but want these guys to succeed.

The app allows users to be Seekers (those looking for a job to be completed) and Runners (those that complete a job). Runners receive money from Seekers (beyond the cost of the actual “errand”) for jobs they complete.

The connection is all via AirRun, without a middleman or phone calls, with jobs ranging from deliveries to projects to someone selling items in a marketplace. Seekers choose Runners based on profiles and reviews by other Seekers.

How did AirRun come about? CEO Rob Matthews told Social Times he came up with the idea a few years ago in an iPhone development class at Miami University when he needed something to avoid failing the class. The company history states, “Thanks to Matthews’ lazy attitude toward, well, everything, he was fascinated by the idea of an easy way for people like him to pay more motivated people for whatever they needed, whether it was picking up dry cleaning, cleaning up after a party, or walking the dog.”

The app went live on the iTunes Store on March 25 and users are presently centered in Chicago where the company is based. Matthews alluded to a number of marketing initiatives to build usage that are in the works, but provided few details.

Professionals, aged 18 to 30, are a prime target audience for AirRun. The company is also targeting college campuses, with concentrated populations and lifestyle that includes both Seekers and Runners. Being a Runner has income potential without the fixed hours of a job that may interfere with classes.

Users need to be convinced that AirRun is, “As safe as Facebook,” Matthews said, as opposed to there being a risk when a Seeker opens the door for a Runner.

“It’s not just about social but rather building a peer-to-peer community with a purpose,” a spokesperson for AirRun told Social Times. “And it’s not about location-based in terms of check-ins, but using geolocation for an actual purpose — connecting people in a certain radius to solve needs. Apps now need to have a real convenience factor/overall reward. It’s about productivity.”

Once the user base grows, the company plans to collect a small surcharge from Seekers using iPhone’s in-app transaction capabilities.

 

Neil Glassman is principal marketing strategist at WhizBangPowWow, with a track record of success across linear, digital and social media. Join his conversation on Twitter or email Neil to talk about marketing or swap recipes.