Reporters, Editors Get Their News From Social Media (Report)

More and more people are getting their news from social media, but where are the people who report the news getting their news from?

More and more people are getting their news from social media, but where are the people who report the news getting their news from?

Ogilvy Public Relations surveyed more than 115 reporters, editors and producers, and its findings included:

  • For news consumption, 35 percent of respondents rely on social media to keep up with the headlines, followed by traditional newspapers (33 percent), newswires (12 percent), broadcast (11 percent) and blogs (5 percent).
  • 44 percent believe today’s programs require traditional, social and paid media.
  • 47 percent view earned media as most influential medium for driving purchasing decisions and business outcomes.
  • The most trusted source of news was traditional media (newspapers, wires, magazines), followed by influencer-driven news, with company-driven news finishing at the bottom.
  • 65 percent agree or strongly agree that the more the media covers a brand, the more credible that brand appears.

Ogilvy Media Influence managing director and head of media relations, North America Jennifer Risi said in a release introducing the survey:

While social media revolutionized the way we communicate, we must not underestimate the power and credibility that traditional media relations provides. The results give a clear indication of the critical role that public relations–and earned media, in particular–has to play within the integrated marketing model. With earned media serving as one of the most efficient and cost effective ways to build trust, organizations are increasingly using this channel to build brand equity, grow sales and drive market share.

Today, the power of earned media for the strategic communication of a brand’s key messages should not be underestimated–it often lends brands the third-party credibility and validation today’s savvy consumers seek out prior to making purchasing decisions.

Readers: What did you think of Oglivy PR’s findings?

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