Facebook Friend Finder Class Action Lawsuit Dismissed

An amended class-action lawsuit filed against Facebook over its use of members' names and pictures to promote its friend finder feature suffered the same fate as its pre-amendment predecessor: dismissed by a federal judge in California.

An amended class-action lawsuit filed against Facebook over its use of members’ names and pictures to promote its friend finder feature suffered the same fate as its pre-amendment predecessor: dismissed by a federal judge in California.

The amended filing of Robyn Cohen, et al. versus Facebook was dismissed Thursday. The original case (see below) was thrown out June 28.

The judge who dismissed the case ruled that the plaintiffs offered no evidence that they had suffered economic harm due to Facebook’s alleged use of their names and likenesses, TechCrunch reported, agreeing with Facebook’s previous contention that the plaintiffs were not harmed, and that their names and photos are considered public information.

“We appreciate the court’s consideration, and we are pleased that all claims were dismissed with prejudice,” Facebook litigation counsel Sandeep Solanki said in a statement responding to yesterday’s ruling.

Facebook is currently fighting other class-action suits, including one that accuses it of tracking users’ Internet browser history even after they log off the social network.

Readers: Do you think the judge acted properly in dismissing the Friend Finder suit?
Cohen v. Facebook, C 10-5282 RS (N.D. Cal. June 28, 2011)