4 Common Twitter Mistakes That Even CEOs Are Unaware Of

Sure, you're a CEO: the big shot at your company, but are your Tweets more sophisticated than those below you?As a CEO, your responsible for the information in your industry. Tweeters in your niche want to know what you know. Provide them with that information.Even though you're used to being professional, don't be afraid to get personal with your Tweets. Followers want to know that you're human, not just some stone cold CEO without any feelings.

Sure, you’re a CEO: the big shot at your company, but are your Tweets more sophisticated than those below you?

As a CEO, your responsible for the information in your industry. Tweeters in your niche want to know what you know. Provide them with that information.

Even though you’re used to being professional, don’t be afraid to get personal with your Tweets. Followers want to know that you’re human, not just some stone cold CEO without any feelings.

Be sure to understand the mistakes below:

Using too many RSS feeds…

RSS feeds are a great way to provide content to other Tweeters, but too many feeds will turn them away. Be sure to only provide relevant content: updates from your company (or companies). Remember: you’re Tweeting to connect yourself to your consumers, not necessarily to market the company that you are a CEO of.

Being too professional…

Being professional in the professional world is a good thing. Unfortunately, in the realm of social media, users want you to be personal. Don’t be afraid to get personal, your followers will like that about you.

Your followers are following you to get to know you: let them. Provide them with your insight on your industry, but also provide them with information about yourself. Let them know that you’re standing in line at Starbucks to order a cafe latte. Getting personal with your followers allows them to relate to you and respond with their own input.

Letting others post your Tweets…

Sure, by all means have someone else set your accounts up for you, so that it makes your life easier. However, don’t have someone post your own Tweets. By doing so, you take away the personal trait that was mentioned above. If you allow someone else to post your Tweets, they are not getting to know you. Also, it makes you ignorant of Twitter.

Being apart of Twitter is cool and hip. Don’t be so far removed from everybody else that you are not aware of how to post a Tweet or the character limit of each post (140 characters).

Talking down to your followers like you know more than they do…

Again, this has to be with you being personal to your followers. Make them feel like you are on the same level with them: you are part of the common people. The best way to go about this is to think of yourself as a politician.

You want to talk with and understand your followers. When you have something to say, speak in layman’s terms. Don’t get too cocky and talk up the fact that you are a CEO and you know more than everyone else. There is a correct way to go about giving information and a wrong way.

 

CJ Arlotta covers the world of social gaming for development firms as well as the average consumer. Currently, he is accumulating more knowledge of the international gaming market to follow and understand what global developers may need to compete with already striving markets.