False memories but real brand experiences | Adweek False memories but real brand experiences | Adweek
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False memories but real brand experiences

Brain_copy Giving people a personal experience of your brand may be easier than we thought. Apparently, when it comes to personal experiences, people are prone to just making them up. A study at the University of Portsmouth in England found that 40 percent of those questioned had false memories about the London bombings of 2005. As many of us here in the U.S. think back on 9/11 this week, we may also be experiencing false memories of where we were that day. Of course, tragedies aren't the only things that cause us to make false memories. In a 2001 experiment at the University of Washington, researchers showed people a fake print ad in which a person describes shaking hands with Bugs Bunny at Disneyland. A third of the participants later recalled the event as if it had happened to them. Wait, does all this mean I didn't actually see Bill Gates buying shoes at my local Shoe Circus? Via Boing Boing.

—Posted by Rebecca Cullers

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