Advertisement

Jordan Levin in Talks to Run Programming at Xbox Former WB chief would report to Nancy Tellem

Jordan Levin | Photo: Getty Images

Jordan Levin, the former CEO of the defunct WB network, is in serious talks with Xbox to take a senior level position that would include running programming at the Microsoft-owned gaming company's burgeoning studio, according to multiple sources.

Levin, most recently president of Alloy Digital, would report to veteran TV executive Nancy Tellem, who joined Xbox in 2012 to build out a new original content business. The deal isn't done, but sources say it is close to completion. Levin has been in talks with other companies.

Levin ran the WB network in the late 1990s, overseeing defining hits like Dawson's Creek, Gilmore Girls and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Tellem ran CBS Entertainment during that time and worked directly with Levin.

In 2006 Levin launched Generate, a Los Angeles-based production/distribution firm specializing in developing projects aimed at the youth market on TV and the Web, including a set of Webisodes for AMC's The Walking Dead.

Alloy Digital acquired Generate in early 2012. Then, last October, Alloy merged with Break Media, a deal that may have led to Levin's interest in exiting the company.

It will be interesting to see what sorts of projects Levin would shepherd at Xbox—and whether that includes scripted teen dramas. There has been heavy interest in the TV and Web video world about the studio and Tellem's plans, but to date, things have been relatively quiet. Xbox has green-lit a documentary about the digital revolution in the U.S. and another on street soccer. The biggest project announced to date has been a scripted version of the mega video game hit Halo involving Steven Spielberg.

Xbox has a monster footprint via which to launch content—close to 50 million subscribers globally, according to Microsoft. And Xbox users are heavy streaming video users.

Microsoft declined to comment for this story.

Advertisement
Advertisement
About VideoWatch

In just a couple short years, Web video has matured from a burgeoning category to a dynamic new business distinct from TV. As a result, the biggest producers, executives and talent in the business are getting onboard, and the Web is nurturing its own breed of stars and storytelling genres. VideoWatch is dedicated to chronicling the players and developments in this exciting new industry. 

Click to Subscribe to VideoWatch RSS