4 Times People Unbelievably but Correctly Predicted the Cubs Winning the World Series

They flew the W early

The Chicago Cubs and Cleveland Indians were tied 3-3 heading into Game 7 Wednesday night, and they were about to make baseball history no matter who won. But there were a few folks, from pop culture favorites to regular Joes, who kinda guessed the outcome years in advance.

Perhaps the most impressive prediction came from a 1993 high school yearbook in which Michael Lee's senior quote was: "Chicago Cubs. 2016 World Series Champions. You heard it here first."

Online, people immediately started investigating and trying to find out if the photo had been doctored. So far, Snopes has deemed it true. But Michael Lee has yet to come forward.

Perhaps Lee was making a reference to Back to the Future II and was just a little off on the year. In the hit movie that came out in 1989, Marty McFly travels to 2015, and the Cubs win a highly futuristic World Series.

Universal Pictures

Even if the year wasn't quite right, it's still baffling how these folks got as close as they did. Though the movie franchise might have gotten a few other things right as well. (Looking at you, Donald Trump.)

And savvy high schooler Lee wasn't the only regular person to come up with that prediction. Tampa Bay area resident Lenn Feraccio predicted it in a tweet two years ago. He says he forgot about the tweet until somebody found it a couple weeks ago.

"I didn't even remember I had written it until that guy tweeted at me," he told Bay News 9.

Aside from these lucky (and kinda spooky) few, the final season of Parks and Recreation, which aired in 2015, made one of the most accurate predictions.

That season was set in different parts of the future, showing where each of its beloved characters ends up. Despite most likely ruining hopes for a future reunion or revival of the show, a certain plotline of note takes place in 2017:

"I was the only person on the staff who cared about baseball enough to track the Cubs' minor league system," Parks and Rec creator Mike Schur told the Washington Post.

Maybe all of these predictions were too "out there" to ever be taken seriously, and that's why it felt safe to make the joke. Guess the Cubs really showed them.