Other EU Countries Want a Piece of Facebook’s Privacy Concession in Belgium

By David Cohen Comment

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The privacy issues Facebook is experiencing in Belgium may soon spread to other European Union countries.

The data-protection authorities in France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain and the Hamburg region of Germany published a joint declaration (embedded below), which called for the social network to suspend its use of cookies—particularly the datr cookie—in their jurisdictions, as the company already agreed to do in Belgium, IDG News Services reported.

The five data-protection authorities wrote in their declaration:

While recognizing the right of Facebook to appeal the aforementioned judgment, the contact group expects Facebook to comply with these orders in all territories of the EU as a means of contributing to ensure consistency with the requirements of the European Directive 95/46/EC and Directive 2002/58/EC, as amended by Directive 2009/136/EC. This statement is without prejudice to the ongoing national investigations and to measures that could consequently be imposed upon Facebook. The measures adopted by Facebook should not bring undue prejudice to the Internet user.

Facebook responded in an email to IDG News Services:

The interim order obtained by the Belgian DPA threatens the security we can offer to everyone who uses Facebook, and we are appealing it to a court that will have the benefit of all the facts. Although the order has no effect outside of Belgium, we welcome the opportunity to share the security threats created by the order with other interested regulators.

Readers: How do you see this playing out?

Common Statement by the Contact Group of the Data Protection Authorities of The Netherlands, France, Spain,…

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